Lindsey Buckingham Talks ‘One Man Show’ « Guitar Aficionado

By Richard Bienstock | Photo by Jeremy Cowart

Earlier this month, Lindsey Buckingham released the live document One Man Show exclusively through iTunes. The album captures the legendary singer and guitarist onstage in Des Moines, Iowa, during a stop on his most recent tour — his first playing a full set of music in a solo acoustic configuration.

Buckingham recently sat down with Guitar Aficionado to discuss the impetus behind doing these shows, the process by which he adapts his music to an acoustic setting, and his feelings on returning to the “Big Machine” — his term for Fleetwood Mac — for a scheduled tour in 2013.

GUITAR AFICIONADO: What led you to embark on this solo acoustic tour?

My mentality for a while has been of this idea of ever moving toward the center, so to speak, in terms of presenting my songs with only guitar and vocal. So it was kind of an experiment. And I wasn’t sure how it would go. I knew in my head I could do all the stuff on my own, but figuring out how to plan the arc of an entire set was more difficult. But the main thing I had to get used to was the idea of standing up there all alone. Those first couple of shows I was looking around the stage going, “Where is everybody?” [laughs] Continue reading

Lindsey Buckingham on Finding Happiness Balancing an Enormous Band and a Cozy Solo Project (Q&A)

11/20/2012 by Chris Parker
Hollywood Reporter

As a guitarist known for his rich, almost orchestral finger-picked playing style, solo acoustic might be the last thing you expect from Lindsey Buckingham. But the Fleetwood Mac veteran isn’t limned in by expectations. (Something about co-penning a 40 million-selling album and being a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.) Last week he released Lindsey Buckingham: One Man Show, culled from his current solo American tour.

When commercial concerns became an issue in Fleetwood Mac, Buckingham’s experimental explorations manifested a solo career that has endured fits and starts. Of late he’s been quite prolific, releasing three discs in six years exploring the kind of intimate, keenly crafted and emotionally edgy songwriter pop favored by indie artists such as Sondre Lerche, Joe Pernice and Ron Sexsmith.

Following the raw, almost lo-fi intensity of 2011’s Seeds We Sow, on which he played every instrument, Buckingham took the next logical step embracing the austerity of the solo performer. He captured a Sept. 1 show in Des Moines, Iowa, and made it available online through the wonders of digital distribution.

Buckingham spoke with The Hollywood Reporter about the freedom of being onstage alone, defying the mediocrity of commercially successful career artists and Fleetwood Mac’s immediate plans — calling from a concert stop near Grand Rapids, Mich., where, liberated from a tour bus, Buckingham had wandered off the beaten path again. Continue reading

BRIT Awards 1998 – Outstanding Contribution to British Music

Fleetwood Mac

Over thirty years after they were formed and two decades since the release of their most famous and biggest selling album, Fleetwood Mac are being honoured with the BRIT Award for Outstanding Contribution to the British Music Industry.

The Anglo/American rock group emerged from Britain’s blues boom of the late 1960s, moved to America in the mid 70s, released the 20 million selling album “Rumours” in 1977 and re-appeared last year with their million selling comeback album ‘The Dance,” During that time Fleetwood Mac have featured a total of 16 musicians in more than a dozen different line-ups built around the one remaining original member, drummer Mick Fleetwood. But it is the five piece of Fleetwood, John McVie, Christine McVie, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks (the band that created the award-winning “Rumours” album and re-formed last year) which is acknowledged as the classic Fleetwood Man line-up and the group honoured at this year’s BRIT Awards ceremony. Continue reading