Duo from Fleetwood Mac goes its own way with new album, Minneapolis concert | Star Tribune

Fleetwood Mac guitarist Lindsey Buckingham is notoriously meticulous in the recording studio. Remember how the band spent a then-record $1 million recording “Tusk” in 1979 because he was so particular?

So how did Mac keyboardist Christine McVie get Mr. Fussy to complete a duo album with her in near record time this year?

“This was not a concept we had in the beginning, to make a duo album. It just kind of happened,” said McVie, who will join Buckingham in concert Monday at Northrop auditorium in Minneapolis. “It didn’t take us that long.”

They worked on a few of her ideas, then went on tour with Fleetwood Mac in 2014 and later revisited the songs. Buckingham brought in five songs of his own, and before you know it they had an album.

“He and I always had a good chemistry musically,” McVie pointed out. “It seemed very natural to me. Easy, actually, to work with him in that way. We’re not the best of friends. We don’t hang out together. But when we get to the studio, we have a good connection.”

No Stevie, no tension

It could be because Stevie Nicks wasn’t involved. When Buckingham and his ex, Nicks, try to work together, there’s always, um, creative tension.

Nicks was busy doing a solo tour to promote her 2014 album “24 Karat Gold,” so Buckingham busied himself with the McVie collaboration.

The rest of Fleetwood Mac — founding drummer Mick Fleetwood and bassist John McVie — also participated in the recording. Not that this was ever going to be a Fleetwood Mac project.

The resulting album “Lindsey Buckingham Christine McVie” features five tunes by each, with Buckingham cowriting three of McVie’s numbers

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Book review: Rock biographer Stephen Davis chronicles Stevie Nicks in new book

The Hutchinson News
Posted Oct 25, 2017 at 10:38 AM

“Gold Dust Woman: The Biography of Stevie Nicks” by Stephen Davis. St. Martin’s Press, 2017. 352 pages. $18.29 / £20.61

Stephen Davis has an unusual wish for a man prior to the release of his 18th rock book — a biography of Fleetwood Mac singer and solo artist and songwriter Stevie Nicks.

“The main thing is I want to be in the next issue of AARP,” said Davis, who wrote “Gold Dust Woman” out of his Milton, Massachusetts, home. “She’s almost 70 and I’m 70, and they send out something like 25 million copies (actually the magazine claims more than 47 million readers).”

Davis said he is fascinated by Nicks, who found stardom relatively late (for a rock star) in her 20′s and still fills an arena both solo and with Fleetwood Mac. She recently announced an 18-month tour starting in mid-2018 with Fleetwood Mac. Her 40 top-50 hits include “Don’t Stop,” the signature song of former President Bill Clinton’s campaign.

“The arc of the story is that initially she wasn’t really wanted in Fleetwood Mac and eventually she went out on her own and became a bigger star than Fleetwood Mac,” said Davis, who began researching “Gold Dust Woman” in 2012 and finished it in 2016. “When I started writing, I thought the book would be a valedictory thing about someone whose career is winding now. Now, I’m just trying to keep up with her and will need to update the book when the paperback comes out in a year.”

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Mick Fleetwood on the early days of Fleetwood Mac and why he’s a terrible drummer | BBC News

Mick Fleetwood is the backbone of the band that bears his name; the man who kept Fleetwood Mac rolling through the best and hardest of times.

In the early days he was their manager, hiring and firing musicians like a soft rock Alan Sugar.

By the late 70s, he was the bandage that stopped them falling apart amidst drug abuse, infidelity and betrayal.

And sitting behind his “back to front” drum kit, Fleetwood is the band’s beating heart, constructing dozens of unforgettable rhythms – from the syncopated shuffle of Go Your Own Way, to the fidgety cowbell riff of Oh Well.

But surprisingly, the 70-year-old doesn’t rate his own drumming.

“There’s no discipline,” he says. “I can’t do the same thing every night.”

Anyone who’s listened to the deluxe edition of Fleetwood Mac’s Tusk will know otherwise. There, you can hear multiple outtakes from the title track, with Fleetwood sitting doggedly on the song’s distinctive groove for more than 25 minutes.

Still, he insists: “I am very not conformed, I change all the time.”

The confession is prompted by a discussion about Fleetwood’s lavish new picture book, Love That Burns, which chronicles his early career and the first incarnations of Fleetwood Mac. Continue reading

British blues: New book heralds early days of Fleetwood Mac | Daily Mail

By Associated Press
Oct 6th, 2017

LONDON (AP) – Mick Fleetwood was 16 when he left school, told his parents he wanted to pursue a career in rock ‘n’ roll, and went to London in search of gigs.

A common tale, true, but this one has a happy ending. Fleetwood fell in with some talented blues enthusiasts, paid (barely) his dues, and soared to stardom with the first incarnation of Fleetwood Mac – and then into the rock ‘n’ roll stratosphere with the second, more pop-oriented version of the band.

“School was not a good thing for me,” said Fleetwood, dressed in classic British style, complete with a pocket watch on a chain.

Mick Fleetwood, the drummer and co-founder of the band Fleetwood Mac speaks before the start of an interview at a hotel in London, Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017. Fleetwood was 16 when he left school, told his parents he wanted to pursue a career in rock ‘n’ roll, and went to London in search of gigs.
A common tale, true, but this one has a happy ending. As a teen, Mick Fleetwood fell in with some talented blues enthusiasts, paid his dues, and soared to stardom with the first incarnation of Fleetwood Mac and then into the rock ‘n’ roll stratosphere with the second, more pop-oriented version of the band. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

“I had a learning disability, no doubt, and no one understood what those things were. I was sort of drowning at school academically. My parents were like, ‘Go and do it.’ They were picking up on the fact that I had found something. They saw the one thing that I loved with a passion was teaching myself how to play drums at home,” he said. “So they sent me off with a little drum kit to London and the whole thing unfolded.”

Fleetwood didn’t really have to rebel, though rebellion was in the air, and he had the good fortune to make friends early with Peter Green, the supremely talented guitarist whose blues sound shaped the band’s early years. Continue reading

Tom Petty dead: How the singer inspired Stevie Nicks song ‘Edge of Seventeen’ | The Independent

The Independent
Jacob Stolworthy

The track’s title came from a conversation the Fleetwood Mac star had wife Petty’s first wife in 1979

Music legend Tom Petty, who has died at the age of 66, spent his illustrious career collaborating with many other musicians ranging from ELO’s Jeff Lynne, George Harrison and, of course, Stevie Nicks.

Interestingly, the singer served as the inspiration for one of the Fleetwood Mac singer’s most famous solo tracks in a rather circuitous way.

“Edge of Seventeen,” released in 1982, was the third single taken from her debut record Bella Donna and while Petty may not have featured on the track, he and first wife Jane Benyo served as inspiration for its title – all thanks to a simple case of miscommunication.

After meeting Benyo, Nicks asked her when she’d met Petty to which Benyo replied “at the age of seventeen,” a comment Nicks misheard as “the edge of seventeen.” According to the singer, she originally planned to write the song about the couple – and was even willing to give Benyo credit for the inspiration – but, the death of her beloved uncle and John Lennon in the same week (December 1980) saw her find new inspiration for the song. The title, however, remained.

Petty married Benyo in 1974 when he was 24. The couple met in their hometown of Gainesville, Florida before moving to LA in an attempt to further his music career. Two years later, Petty would release his debut record – Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers – which featured the songs “Breakdown” and “American Girl.”

 

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