Mick Fleetwood on the early days of Fleetwood Mac and why he’s a terrible drummer | BBC News

Mick Fleetwood is the backbone of the band that bears his name; the man who kept Fleetwood Mac rolling through the best and hardest of times.

In the early days he was their manager, hiring and firing musicians like a soft rock Alan Sugar.

By the late 70s, he was the bandage that stopped them falling apart amidst drug abuse, infidelity and betrayal.

And sitting behind his “back to front” drum kit, Fleetwood is the band’s beating heart, constructing dozens of unforgettable rhythms – from the syncopated shuffle of Go Your Own Way, to the fidgety cowbell riff of Oh Well.

But surprisingly, the 70-year-old doesn’t rate his own drumming.

“There’s no discipline,” he says. “I can’t do the same thing every night.”

Anyone who’s listened to the deluxe edition of Fleetwood Mac’s Tusk will know otherwise. There, you can hear multiple outtakes from the title track, with Fleetwood sitting doggedly on the song’s distinctive groove for more than 25 minutes.

Still, he insists: “I am very not conformed, I change all the time.”

The confession is prompted by a discussion about Fleetwood’s lavish new picture book, Love That Burns, which chronicles his early career and the first incarnations of Fleetwood Mac. Continue reading

British blues: New book heralds early days of Fleetwood Mac | Daily Mail

By Associated Press
Oct 6th, 2017

LONDON (AP) – Mick Fleetwood was 16 when he left school, told his parents he wanted to pursue a career in rock ‘n’ roll, and went to London in search of gigs.

A common tale, true, but this one has a happy ending. Fleetwood fell in with some talented blues enthusiasts, paid (barely) his dues, and soared to stardom with the first incarnation of Fleetwood Mac – and then into the rock ‘n’ roll stratosphere with the second, more pop-oriented version of the band.

“School was not a good thing for me,” said Fleetwood, dressed in classic British style, complete with a pocket watch on a chain.

Mick Fleetwood, the drummer and co-founder of the band Fleetwood Mac speaks before the start of an interview at a hotel in London, Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017. Fleetwood was 16 when he left school, told his parents he wanted to pursue a career in rock ‘n’ roll, and went to London in search of gigs.
A common tale, true, but this one has a happy ending. As a teen, Mick Fleetwood fell in with some talented blues enthusiasts, paid his dues, and soared to stardom with the first incarnation of Fleetwood Mac and then into the rock ‘n’ roll stratosphere with the second, more pop-oriented version of the band. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

“I had a learning disability, no doubt, and no one understood what those things were. I was sort of drowning at school academically. My parents were like, ‘Go and do it.’ They were picking up on the fact that I had found something. They saw the one thing that I loved with a passion was teaching myself how to play drums at home,” he said. “So they sent me off with a little drum kit to London and the whole thing unfolded.”

Fleetwood didn’t really have to rebel, though rebellion was in the air, and he had the good fortune to make friends early with Peter Green, the supremely talented guitarist whose blues sound shaped the band’s early years. Continue reading

Tom Petty dead: How the singer inspired Stevie Nicks song ‘Edge of Seventeen’ | The Independent

The Independent
Jacob Stolworthy

The track’s title came from a conversation the Fleetwood Mac star had wife Petty’s first wife in 1979

Music legend Tom Petty, who has died at the age of 66, spent his illustrious career collaborating with many other musicians ranging from ELO’s Jeff Lynne, George Harrison and, of course, Stevie Nicks.

Interestingly, the singer served as the inspiration for one of the Fleetwood Mac singer’s most famous solo tracks in a rather circuitous way.

“Edge of Seventeen,” released in 1982, was the third single taken from her debut record Bella Donna and while Petty may not have featured on the track, he and first wife Jane Benyo served as inspiration for its title – all thanks to a simple case of miscommunication.

After meeting Benyo, Nicks asked her when she’d met Petty to which Benyo replied “at the age of seventeen,” a comment Nicks misheard as “the edge of seventeen.” According to the singer, she originally planned to write the song about the couple – and was even willing to give Benyo credit for the inspiration – but, the death of her beloved uncle and John Lennon in the same week (December 1980) saw her find new inspiration for the song. The title, however, remained.

Petty married Benyo in 1974 when he was 24. The couple met in their hometown of Gainesville, Florida before moving to LA in an attempt to further his music career. Two years later, Petty would release his debut record – Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers – which featured the songs “Breakdown” and “American Girl.”

 

Mick Fleetwood: ‘Next tour will not be Fleetwood Mac’s last’ | Belfast Telegraph

The 70-year-old rocker reveals the band’s 2018 world tour will include a few rarities. Fleetwood Mac leader Mick Fleetwood has assured fans the band’s 2018 tour won’t be a finale.

Bandmate Christine McVie has hinted that the upcoming 18-month global trek will be a farewell, but the drummer insists the band has more music to play and perhaps record.

“In my mind, it’s not (the final tour), and everyone in the band has decided that it’s not,” he tells Rolling Stone, “but we thought we were finished 30 years ago…

“I don’t know if morbid is the correct word here, but when everyone is in their 70s and you think about five years from now… Phil Collins is calling his tour Not Dead Yet. Well, we’re not dead yet, but God forbid, we might be, so you could be like, ‘I better go and see them!’

“But you will not see a poster saying this is our farewell tour that I could dream of.”

And Fleetwood, 70, reveals he and Stevie Nicks recently met up in Italy and checked out some old forgotten songs they’re thinking of revamping for the 2018 tour.

“She said to me, ‘Let’s sit down and really listen to some stuff that sort of almost got forgotten’,” he shares. “So I know she’s already thinking she wants to do some things we haven’t done in years. I always think that Stevie and Lindsey (Buckingham) should do a Buckingham Nicks song in the set. And Christine should do a blues song.”

And there’s always the possibility that the band could play an entire album onstage – like Rumours.

“It would be fantastic, but we’d have to be like Bruce Springsteen – out there for seven hours,” Fleetwood laughs. “Then it could be the last tour. You’ll see wooden boxes onstage. Five of them.”

Belfast Telegraph Digital

Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie Talk Debut Duo Album | Guitar World

Guitar World Magazine
By: John Russo
21st Aug, 2017

The classic Fleetwood Mac lineup always was an odd bunch.

Three members—Mick Fleetwood, John McVie and Christine McVie—came out of the seminal Sixties British blues scene. Which means they had little in common musically with the other two members, the sunny California pop duo of Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks.

But out of these disparate musical backgrounds, and often conflicting personalities, came one of the great supergroups of the Seventies. With massive hits like “Rhiannon,” “Don’t Stop,” “Go Your Own Way,” “Dreams,” “Over My Head” and “You Make Loving Fun,” Fleetwood Mac ruled the charts throughout the decade. Their 1977 album Rumours has sold 20 million copies to date. Fleetwood Mac continue to be a huge concert draw, and will headline the massive Classic East and West Festivals in July.

Various members of Fleetwood Mac have stepped forward with solo albums and side projects over the years. Buckingham’s own body of sonically adventurous yet poppy solo discs have attracted a substantial following among guitar enthusiasts and fans of well-turned songcraft. But one combination that hasn’t been tried—until now—is pairing Buckingham with keyboardist-vocalist Christine McVie.

Simply titled Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie, the new album by Fleetwood Mac’s guitarist and keyboardist—not to mention two of the band’s three vocalists—showcases two superb talents that were often overshadowed by Fleetwood Mac’s iconic singer and dreamy, mystical tunesmith Stevie Nicks. And with Mick Fleetwood’s drumming and John McVie’s bass playing featured prominently on the album, it does at times seem like an alternate reality version of one of pop music’s most iconic bands.

Continue reading

‘I was always that gypsy’: Stevie Nicks reminisces her nomadic upbringing and talks about her hectic schedule ahead of her Australian tour | Daily Mail (AUS)

Stevie Nicks is one of rock music’s most iconic figures.

And the 69-year-old singer-songwriter has talked about her affinity for the gypsy-like lifestyle, instilled in her at an early age as a result of her father’s work as the vice-president of Greyhound Buses and president of a food company.

‘I was able to go into new schools and make new friends. My brother, on the other hand, didn’t cope with it so well,’ she told Stellar.

‘I was always that gypsy’: Stevie Nicks has talked about her affinity for the gypsy-like lifestyle, instilled in her at an early age as a result of her father’s work

This extended into her life on the road with Fleetwood Mac in 1975, and her successful solo career, which followed in the 80s.

‘So the thing is, am I still that gypsy? Well, I was always that gypsy,’ she said.

Even today, life on the road sees the Landslide singer travel around the world to perform shows.

Continue reading

Fleetwood Mac Caps Classic West With Poignant Closing Set | Billboard

Billboard Online
7/17/2017
by

Fleetwood Mac operates on one’s imagination in a way few other bands can — whether within your musical memory, or onstage at Dodger Stadium as they were Sunday night (July 16), for the second evening of Classic West.

Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Scoop Marketing
Stevie Nicks of Fleetwood Mac performs during The Classic West at Dodger Stadium on July 16, 2017 in Los Angeles.

The sweetly intoned, plaintive melodies of Christine McVie, the now-gentle, now-angry mini-operas of Stevie Nicks, and what might be called the ecstatic agonies (“Bleed To Love Her,” anyone?) of Lindsey Buckingham, all swirl into an understanding that emotion will come to the fore. The shorthand for their genre is “hits,” and they delivered plenty to a crowd that roared appreciatively from the time the lights went down to usher in “The Chain” to the last notes of “Don’t Stop,” 20 songs later.

The inherent drama that suffuses any Fleetwood Mac performance might be baldly stated as “Who’s still in love with whom?” and the band not only lives with that as a sometimes-aggravating hangover — reliving your late twenties onstage as a member of a band whose average age hovers near 70 can’t always be easy — but as an evergreen dramatic conceit.

Opening with “The Chain” definitely fed the beast of tortured past relationships as a topic: “And if you don’t love me now/ You will never love me again” reverberated with feeling even as it showcased the group’s durable trademark sound — Fleetwood’s funereal drumbeats, John McVie’s underrated mutterings on bass, the ladies’ baleful harmonies, and Buckingham’s venomous leads. Buckingham’s clearly incapable of pretending it’s an evening’s casual entertainment and would come on at the end — spotlight chasing him as he gyrated somewhere near the park’s bullpen — to reinforce that he’s one of the great closers in the trade. Continue reading

Fleetwood Mac to earn MusiCares Person of the Year | Daily Mail

Associated Press
19th July, 2017

NEW YORK (AP) – Fleetwood Mac will be named the 2018 MusiCares Person of the Year, becoming the first group to receive the honor.

FILE – In this Oct. 9, 2014 file photo, John McVie, from left, Christine McVie, Stevie Nicks, Lindsey Buckingham and Mick Fleetwood from the band Fleetwood Mac appear on NBC’s “Today” show in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)

The Recording Academy announced Wednesday that the 28th annual benefit gala will take place at Radio City Music Hall in New York on Jan. 26, 2018, two days before the 2018 Grammy Awards.

The organization said they are honoring the iconic group for “their significant creative accomplishments and their longtime support of a number of charitable causes.”

Mick Fleetwood, who called the award “tremendous” in a statement, will receive the honor along with Stevie Nicks, Lindsey Buckingham, Christine McVie and John McVie.

Past honorees include Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin, Quincy Jones, Stevie Wonder and Barbra Streisand. The MusiCares Foundation offers health and human services and programs to members of the music community.

_____

Online:

https://www.grammy.com/musicares

 

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Fans delirious as Stevie Nicks joins Tom Petty on stage | BBC News

The musicians collaborated on several songs in the 1980s / LILY GRAE (TWITTER)

It was Side A all the way when Tom Petty played the BST festival in Hyde Park on Sunday.

“We’re going to look at the show like it’s a giant one-sided vinyl,” said the star, “and we’re going to drop the needle all up and down the record.”

The set included nearly two dozen classics, such as Free Fallin’, I Won’t Back Down and Learning To Fly.

Stevie Nicks joined him halfway through the set for a special version of their 1981 hit Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around.

“You know that Tom Petty is my favourite rock star!” said the singer.

Nicks had earlier played a support slot, running through her Fleetwood Mac songbook with renditions of Dreams and Gold Dust Woman, alongside solo hits Edge of Seventeen and Landslide.

After playing Rhiannon, the 69-year-old noted she’d played the song at every concert since it was released in 1975.

“It’s never not been done,” she deadpanned. “Rhiannon: You just can’t get rid of her.”

Nicks also delved into her pre-fame catalogue with the Buckingham-Nicks song Crying In The Night which, she noted, was written in 1970, when she was a struggling musician working as a waitress in LA.

“Dreams do come true,” she told the audience. “Because 44 years later you can sing a song you thought nobody would ever hear in Hyde Park in London, England.” Continue reading

Stevie Nicks fears “isolated” Prince may have deliberately overdosed on fentanyl to kill himself | Daily Mirror

By 22:00, 8 JUL 2017
Daily Mirror

The Fleetwood Mac singer believes her friend Prince was devastated by his prescription drug addiction after making it his life’s work to “preach about the downfall of people that do drugs”

Stevie Nicks fears that close pal Prince may have wanted to end his own life.

The legendary hitmaker died aged 57 in April last year after taking an accidental overdose of prescription drug fentanyl.

He had been battling chronic hip pain and Fleetwood Mac singer Stevie, who got close to Prince in the 1980s, says he was isolated.

She explains: “I don’t know in my heart of hearts whether he just took too much.

“Or did he purposefully take too much? Did he accidentally take too much?”

“When you get to be our age – and he was younger than me – and you’re like, ‘I’m not making hit records any more… I’m not able to really tour any more because of my health…’

“You’re not married, you don’t have children… you don’t hang out with a bunch of people because you’re really an isolationist.”

Stevie, 69, who takes to the stage at Hyde Park’s British Summer Time concert alongside her life-long pal Tom Petty tomorrow night, reckons Prince was devastated by his prescription drug addiction.

She adds: “Fentanyl is the worst of the worst of the worst; way stronger than heroin, morphine, anything – and he was having to take it because I think he was probably fractured from his neck down to his feet.

“I think when you’re in that much pain, and you’re somebody who has made it your life’s work to preach about the downfall of people that do drugs, that had to be [a burden]. I think that broke his heart.”

But Prince lives on in her song Moonlight which she regularly dedicates to him.

Let’s hope she plays it this weekend.

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