Christine McVie: “Fleetwood Mac’s 2018 tour is supposed to be a farewell tour” | Uncut Magazine

Tom Pinnock
March 16, 2017

McVie and Lindsey Buckingham reveal all about their collaboration in our exclusive interview

The pair’s debut as Buckingham McVie – also featuring Mick Fleetwood and John McVie – is set for release this summer.

“I’ve grown up a lot since the last time I really worked with [Christine],” explains Buckingham. “I realised: ‘Oh, here I am, a completely different person. I’m a father of three children. I’ve been married almost 20 years. I’ve had my journey, and Christine has had her own journey.’”

However, the singer, keyboardist and songwriter also reveals that the future of Fleetwood Mac is far from certain.

“The 2018 tour is supposed to be a farewell tour,” says McVie. “But you take farewell tours one at a time. Somehow we always come together, this unit. We can feel it ourselves.”

Buckingham and McVie are on the cover of the new Uncut, dated May 2017 and on sale March 16.

Click here to buy the issue digitally

Mick Fleetwood: ‘I’m 70 years old and I play harder now than I used to’ | The Guardian

The co-founder of Fleetwood Mac talks the glory days of the band, touring as a septuagenarian and what the swinging 60s were really like

‘I don’t know how much longer I’ll be able to do what I do’ … Mick Fleetwood. Photograph: Daniel Sullivan

Hey, Mick. How are you?
I’m OK, but I’ve got coconut oil all over my water bottle.

Coconut oil?
I put it on my hands. When you get old, you get lizard skin. I didn’t know but it’s an antiseptic. I put it on my head too. It doesn’t smell and it’s not full of chemicals. You can use it for cooking and it’s good for sex, too.

Sex and bald heads? Mick, I wasn’t prepared for this.
Well, now you know. It’s multipurpose stuff.

It’s the midway point of SXSW and some people are looking worse for wear. Any tips for hangover cures?
Drink lots of electrolytes even if you need to go to the toilet all the time, it’s worth it. And get hold of avocado or watermelon. Avocado is full of electrolytes and protein. Put it on some toast. Put a big fucking mashed-up avocado on toast and you’ll come back like you’ve never seen before.

Gracias. Why have you decided to put out a book about early Fleetwood Mac?
My former brother-in-law, George Harrison, did a similar thing in 1980. I saw it back then and it was something I wanted to do but didn’t get round to it. Jimmy Page did one for Led Zeppelin too. It’s all about what started the band and a lot of people don’t know about that period, and the band is 50 years old in August for the original members of Fleetwood Mac. This is the beginning of the group and it’s very important to me. Continue reading

The Last Word: Stevie Nicks Talks Aging, Addiction, Fleetwood Mac’s Future | Rolling Stone

By Andy Greene
Rolling Stone

The singer on listening to her heart, turning 70 and why music comes before friendship

Stevie Nicks doesn’t have much sympathy for peers who are aging less gracefully than her. “I see lots of people my age, and lots of people who are younger than me, and I think, ‘Wow, those people look really old,'” she tells Rolling Stone. “I think it’s because they didn’t try.”

At 68, the legendary singer-songwriter is staying as busy as ever. In December, Nicks wrapped an extensive solo tour, and in July, she and her Fleetwood Mac bandmates will co-headline a pair of high-profile classic-rock fests in L.A. and New York. Nicks took some time recently to share her wisdom on drugs, relationships, aging and why her solo career was vital to Fleetwood Mac’s success.
What’s the hardest part of success?
I work very, very hard. I have a piece of typewritten paper here that says, “You keep going and you don’t stop.” You do your vocal lesson. I have a lot of friends from high school and college who want to hang out when I play in their city. I have to rest for my show. It breaks my heart, but what comes first? Don’t endanger my show. That’s been my mantra my whole life: Don’t endanger my show.

Who is your hero?
Michelle Obama, because she has such an optimistic outlook and she was able to move into the White House with kids and do such a beautiful, graceful job. That had to be really hard. After spending two weeks with my family for the holidays, which was long and emotionally difficult, I know that’s super hard. I think she’s wisdom personified.

What advice would you give to your younger self?
How about my early-forties self? That’s when I walked out of Betty Ford after beating coke. I spent two months doing so well. But all my business managers and everyone were urging me to go to this guy who was supposedly­ the darling of the psychiatrists. That was the guy who put me on Klonopin. This is the man who made me go from 123 pounds to almost 170 pounds at five feet two. He stole eight years of my life.

Maybe I would have gotten married, maybe I would have had a baby, maybe I would have made three or four more great albums with Fleetwood Mac. That was the prime of my life, and he stole it. And you know why? Because I went along with what everybody else thought. So what I would tell my 40-year-old self: “Don’t listen to other people. In your heart of hearts, you know what’s best for you.” Continue reading

Stevie Nicks: Recording ‘Tango’ in my ex-boyfriend’s bedroom was ‘extremely strange | Miami Herald

BY HOWARD COHEN
hcohen@miamiherald.com

On Friday, March 10 (re-scheduled till March 31), Fleetwood Mac releases a 30th anniversary expanded edition of one of its most popular and influential albums, “Tango in the Night.” The lavishly packaged reissue offers a remastered version of the original album, a disc of B-sides and outtakes, plus another disc of 12-inch dance mixes of its hit singles like “Big Love” and “Little Lies” and a vinyl LP.

The 30th anniversary edition of Fleetwood Mac’s 1987 album, “Tango in the Night,” hits retail on March 10. The album includes four Top 40 singles, “Big Love,” “Seven Wonders,” “Little Lies” and “Everywhere” and remains the last studio album to feature the original “Rumours” lineup. Warner Bros./Rhino

For Stevie Nicks, the group’s star attraction, recording her parts for the 1987 album proved difficult. After the completion of a ragged tour for her third solo album, 1985’s “Rock a Little,” she went into rehab at the Betty Ford Center for a cocaine addiction. After her release, she was misguidedly placed on a Klonopin regimen. Few in her inner circle thought rehab would stick unless she was dosed on anxiety medication. They were wrong.

Her first test: joining her Fleetwood Mac band mates for the 1986 tracking sessions for “Tango in the Night.” The band hadn’t recorded since the release of “Mirage” in 1982.

Nicks’ ex-boyfriend Lindsey Buckingham, the group’s guitarist, was co-producing the band’s efforts, again, but this time the tension was poisonous, even by Fleetwood Mac’s standards.

“When I started recording for ‘Tango,’ they were recording at Lindsey’s house up on Mulholland somewhere. He lived there with his girlfriend Cheri and this record was being recorded at his house and I didn’t find that to be a great situation for me. Especially coming out of rehab,” Nicks said in an interview last year. “And then I was on Klonopin and not quite understanding why I was feeling so weird and this doctor kept saying, ‘This is what you need.’ It’s the typical scenario of a groupie doctor. Discuss rock and roll with you, so in order to do that he would keep upping your dose so you’d come in once a week.”

John McVie (seated), Mick Fleetwood (standing), Christine McVie (on floor), Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks (on seat) in a photo shoot from the “Tango in the Night” sessions. The original album was released in April 1987 and was a worldwide hit, especially in England where it hit No. 1. In the United States the album spent 44 weeks in the Top 40. Warners Bros./Rhino

Nicks sets the scenario: “I can remember going up there and not being happy to even be there and we were doing vocals in their master bedroom and that was extremely strange. In all fairness, it was like the only empty room and they had a beautiful master bedroom all set up like a vocal booth but I found it very uncomfortable, personally. I guess I didn’t go very often and when I did go I would get like, ‘Give me a shot of brandy and let me sing on four or five songs off the top of my head.’” Continue reading

Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours is 40 years old | Official UK Charts Company

Chart feats and facts about the classic album, released in 1977.

By Justin Myers
Official UK Charts Company

This year marks 40 years since the release of Rumours, from Fleetwood Mac, one of the most revered and talked about albums ever.

From its iconic cover, to its songs, which you can still hear played regularly on the radio and all around you, Rumours fairly quickly established itself as a classic.

Almost as fascinating as the material itself was the backstory behind its production, with the band in love, at war and, shall we say, indulging in the full trappings of rockstar hedonism.

The album first entered the Official Albums Chart at 57 – it wasn’t unusual for albums to start low and climb back then – but rocketed 50 places into the Top 10 the following week. Rumours would spend a (non-consecutive) 44 weeks in the Top 10 and while it did a little bit of pogo-ing up and down, it never went lower than 15 for almost a year.

Surprisingly, perhaps, Rumours only managed one week at Number 1, in January 1978, dispatching Bread off the top before being deposed themselves by Abba’s The Album.

It also might shock you to know that the album’s four singles weren’t hugely successful. Lead single Go Your Own Way – which gained new fame years later when it was featured in a car advert – peaked at Number 38 in 1977, and while it has made a few reappearances in the Top 100 since downloads were counted toward the chart, it never bested that original high. Follow-up Don’t Stop befell a similar fate, landing at 32, but the third single fared slightly better Continue reading

Fleetwood Mac – Hear an unreleased version of Seven Wonders | The Guardian

Michael Hann
The Guardian
16th Feb 2017

We’ve got an early version of one of the standouts from Tango in the Night for you. Have a listen and let us know what you think

Stevie Nicks … on stage with Fleetwood Mac in 1987. Photograph: Jim Dyson/Redferns/Getty Images

Fleetwood Mac have spent the past few years reissuing their peerless back catalogue in the obligatory remastered, expanded, deluxe editions. Last year brought us the 1982 album Mirage, which somehow managed to make an album already slathered in cocaine sound even more cokey, all sheen and shine.

Next up is Tango in the Night, coming out on Warner on 10 March, and we’ve got this early, unreleased version of the Stevie Nicks track Seven Wonders for you. It’s longer but also a little harsher than the album version, drawing out the fatalism of the chorus and de-emphasising the keyboard hook.

Open Stream in New Windows (UK viewers only)

Tango in the Night came out five years after Mirage, and had originally been planned as a Lindsey Buckingham solo record – Nicks spent only two weeks in the studio with the band because she was concentrating on her solo career. Be thankful that it became a full-band record, because the album became defined not by his songs but by the contributions of the other writers; without the two singles from Christine McVie – Everywhere and Little Lies – it would be a very different record. While many Mac fans might have their favourite writer in the group, it takes all three of Buckingham, Nicks and McVie to balance the group. It was noticeable how different the shows with McVie back in the band were to those when the group was performing only the Buckingham and Nicks songs; it was if her songs were the bridge between Nicks’s airy proto-gothiness and Buckingham’s barely suppressed rage.

Continue reading

Fleetwood Mac Unearth Rare Tracks for ‘Tango in the Night’ Reissue | Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone
By: Ryan Reed
25th Jan, 2017

Deluxe, remastered edition of 1987 LP includes previously unheard demos, alternate recordings

Fleetwood Mac prepped a remastered, 30th anniversary reissue of 1987 LP ‘Tango in the Night’ featuring rare tracks and unheard recordings. Pictorial Press Ltd/Alamy

Fleetwood Mac will release an expansive, 30th anniversary edition of their 14th studio album, 1987’s Tango in the Night, on March 10th via Warner Bros. Records. The reissue is packaged in three formats: a one-CD set featuring remastered audio, an expanded two-CD version with rare and unreleased recordings and a deluxe version featuring three CDs, a 180-gram LP and a DVD with music videos and a high-resolution version of the album.

With Tango in the Night, Fleetwood Mac fully immersed themselves in the decade’s glossy production style. Showcasing the diverse styles of primary songwriters Lindsey Buckingham, Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie, the 12-track LP spawned a quartet of hit singles: “Big Love,” “Seven Wonders,” “Everywhere” and “Little Lies.” Their second highest-selling album behind 1977 masterwork Rumours, it remains the group’s final studio project with the classic quintet line-up of Buckingham, Nicks, McVie, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood.

The deluxe and expanded reissues features a disc of 13 previously unheard recordings, including an alternate version of shimmering Christine McVie ballad “Mystified,” a demo of Buckingham’s epic, percussion-heavy title-track and rare B-sides “Down Endless Street” and “Ricky.” The deluxe edition offers a third disc with 14 12-inch mixes – including dub versions of “Seven Wonders and “Everywhere” – and a DVD with videos of “Big Love,” “Seven Wonders,” “Little Lies,” “Family Man” and “Everywhere.”

Buckingham and Christine McVie recently announced an album of duets tentatively titled Buckingham McVie. The set, which features contributions from John McVie and Fleetwood, is loosely slated for a May release. Continue reading

Stevie Nicks: ‘I was so sick — I couldn’t shower. I almost died’ | The Times (UK)

Will Hodgkinson
January 21 2017, 12:01am,
The Times

The Fleetwood Mac singer talks about her past lovers, drugs hell — and why, at 68, she’s not too old to get married

Stevie Nicks is coming to Hyde Park for a summer concert
GETTY IMAGES

If you have wondered how Stevie Nicks, at the age of 68, manages to tour the world with Fleetwood Mac, run her solo career and be an inspiration to young female stars including Adele and Florence Welch, here’s the answer. She’s scared that if she stops, she’ll shrink.

“A friend told me that when you retire, you get smaller,” says Nicks, who at 5ft 1in cannot afford to take that chance. “Small means old, so I fight it with a sword. I’ll be on stage, dancing around, thinking, ‘Now, let’s see . . . how old am I again? 110?’ And it blows my mind! But I would be so bored if I wasn’t doing this.”

It is one in the morning, and Nicks is sheltering from a rainstorm in her beachfront apartment in Santa Monica. Announcing that she rarely goes to sleep before the small hours because she is “the Cruella de Vil of the night”, she proves to be fighting the war against age valiantly. Her California gypsy fashion sense, first shared with the world on the cover of Fleetwood Mac’s 1977 divorce-era masterpiece, Rumours, remains unchanged. Her weathered voice, sexy in a stayed-up-till-7am way, is the same as it ever was. And this July she will be sharing a Hyde Park headline slot with Tom Petty, the man who kickstarted her solo career in 1981, when Fleetwood Mac were at their Lear Jethopping height and nobody wanted or expected Nicks to break out on her own.

Stevie Nicks, photographed in 1978 — her California gypsy fashion sense was already established
SAM EMERSON/POLARIS/EYEVINE

“When I started work on [the debut solo album] Bella Donna I wanted it to be like a Tom Petty record, but by a girl. That led me to Tom’s producer, Jimmy Iovine, who did not drink, do drugs, anything,” says Nicks, who at the time was known for her cocaine-centric lifestyle; she even wrote a song, Gold Dust Woman, about it. Continue reading

Stevie Nicks says another Fleetwood Mac album is unlikely: ‘We’re not 40 anymore’ | Standard

London Evening Standard
By Alistair Foster
Tues 17th Jan, 2017

The music icon says the band are more keen to focus on touring

Stevie Nicks says she does not think Fleetwood Mac will make another album together — because they are “not 40” any more.

The singer, 68, believes the band are more likely to focus on touring and doubts they will ever record a follow-up to 2003’s Say You Will.

She said: “If the five of us were to get together to make a record it would take a year, which is what it always takes us.

“It would be a whole year of recording, then press, then rehearsal, and by the time we got back onto the road, it would be heading towards the second year, and I don’t know whether at this time it’s better for us just to do a big tour.”

Iconic: Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac perform (Getty)

The band has sold more than 100 million records and reformed with the classic line-up of Nicks, Lindsey Buckingham, John and Christine McVie and Mick Fleetwood for a world tour, which ended in 2015.

Nicks said: “It’s every single penny we make divided by five, so the expense of making a record, which is huge, and then to get back on tour … we are not 40.

“We have to take that into consideration — how long can we do tours that are three-hour shows? Would you rather spend a year in the studio or get back on the road? I think that the band would choose to tour.”

Nicks, who is focusing on her solo career, is also reluctant to make new music.

Don’t believe the rumours: Christine McVie and Lindsey Buckingham’s duets album is bad news for Fleetwood Mac fans | The Telegraph

The Telegraph
Neil McCormick
Jan 17th, 2017

Fleetwood Mac are celebrated as one of the great dysfunctional soap operas of rock and roll, a dynastic saga set to music. They are almost as famous for the bed-hopping, powder sniffing, emotional traumas they have inflicted upon one another over the years as for their era-defining monster hits.

So news that two of its most cherished members are making an album together is a cause for intrigue, a sense that there may still be a twist or two ahead in the long running and increasingly convoluted narrative.

It was revealed this week that guitarist, singer and songwriter Lindsey Buckingham has been working on an album of duets with keyboard player, singer and songwriter Christine McVie. It is tentatively scheduled to be released in May, under the name Buckingham McVie. That in itself represents an inescapable reference to Buckingham Nicks, the pre-Fleetwood duo made up of Lindsey and former lover Stevie Nicks.

To add spice to the rumour mill, the rhythm section of drummer Mick Fleetwood and bassist (and Christine’s ex-husband) John McVie appear on the album. So the only one of the famous five missing is the elusive Nicks.

There have been 16 members over Fleetwood Mac’s 50 year career, in a constant shuffling of roles that would leave the scriptwriters for Dallas breathless. Most of the bit part players have been forgotten by now but the five leads who united in the mid-70s to create some of the most glorious pop rock ever heard continue to exert fascination.

Legendary albums such as Rumours and Tusk were created in a whirl of narcotic excess, sexual shenanigans and romantic betrayal that lent an undoubted frisson and emotional subtext to songs of love, longing, loss and reconciliation, in which tough emotions were glossed with glorious melodies and sparkling harmonies.

When the classic line up reunited with Christine McVie in 2015, it was intriguing to note that there were three former couples sharing a stage, taking into account that Mick Fleetwood romanced Nicks behind Buckingham’s back during the making of Tusk. Fleetwood has often described the band’s complicated dynamic as a form of ongoing “group therapy”. Continue reading