Fleetwood Mac Shares Early Version of 1975 Classic ‘Monday Morning’ | Billboard

Billboard Online
11th Jan 2018
by Gary Graff

As the opening track on 1975’s five-times-platinum Fleetwood Mac album, “Monday Morning” was the first thing most fans heard from the new incarnation of the band after Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks joined. But the song also revealed a new Buckingham. You can listen to an exclusive early take of the song, from the upcoming Fleetwood Mac deluxe edition here

The singer-guitarist and his then-girlfriend Nicks joined Fleetwood Mac at the recommendation of co-producer Keith Olsen, after releasing their own Buckingham Nicks album. And Buckingham freely acknowledges that becoming part of a group required him to adjust his approach to music.

“If you go all the way back to before Stevie and I joined Fleetwood Mac, the application of guitar was a lot more prevalent in the whole scheme of the space that was taken and the work that was done by a particular instrument,” Buckingham, who wrote the buoyant, surging “Monday Morning” for a second Buckingham Nicks album, told Billboard previously. “I wasn’t even sure what my role was gonna be at that point; Obviously it was kind of a lesson in adaptation for me, and maybe giving up on certain things and concentrating on other things which were maybe strengths for the good of the band. So part of the exercise of joining Fleetwood Mac was adapting down to not only fit a sound, but I had to get off the guitar I was using and get on to a Les Paul. Their sound was very fat, and the nature of the playing with Christine (McVie) and John (McVie), there was a lot of space taken, so you had to sort of take what was left and fit into it.”

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BOOK REVIEW: Gold Dust Woman: The Biography of Stevie Nicks

Enjoyed this book and completed it in a few days over the Christmas / New Year period whilst free from work duties.

The book was thorough and covered Stevie Nicks’ life in detail up to the year 2017 and covered a few items that I was not aware of, however, the author as an experienced writer that has written books on other members of Fleetwood Mac and other musical figures the fact-checking here was not very good, which makes me wonder if anything that I did not already know about Stevie’s life is actually accurate.

It is a shame as this book had the potential to be the definitive biography of Stevie Nicks (until she decides to write her own autobiography) but the fact-checking and errors really let this down, so near yet so far Mr Davis, please review with your editors in more detail before completing your next book as these errors really let you and the book down.

As a recommendation, I would say this book is good and thorough, but for a recent book on the life of Stevie Nicks and Fleetwood Mac I would refer anyone to Mick Fleetwood’s recent memoir ‘Play On‘ that was released in 2014, at least you know that much of the content is accurate, or as accurate as Mick remembers, and of course he was there!

 

Fleetwood Mac to reissue self-titled 1975 album featuring unreleased material | NME

NME
By Damien Jones
Nov 16th, 2017

Band are also planning a world tour in 2018

Fleetwood Mac have announced plans to reissue their self-titled 1975 album, featuring unreleased material.

The remastered album will be available in three different formats: a single-CD, a 2xCD collection featuring unreleased studio and live recordings, and a 3xCD/LP/DVD deluxe edition that features additional live material.

Among the previously unreleased recordings are live performances and early takes of a number of tracks including ‘Rhiannon’, ‘Landslide’, and ‘Say You Love Me’.

The live songs were recorded during concerts in 1976, and the deluxe edition will include 14 additional unreleased live tracks.

The deluxe edition will also include the original album pressed on 180-gram vinyl, plus a DVD featuring 5.1 surround sound and high-resolution 24/96 stereo audio mixes of the record.

The reissue will be released on January 19 via Warner Bros.

The tracklisting for the deluxe edition is listed below:

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Duo from Fleetwood Mac goes its own way with new album, Minneapolis concert | Star Tribune

Fleetwood Mac guitarist Lindsey Buckingham is notoriously meticulous in the recording studio. Remember how the band spent a then-record $1 million recording “Tusk” in 1979 because he was so particular?

So how did Mac keyboardist Christine McVie get Mr. Fussy to complete a duo album with her in near record time this year?

“This was not a concept we had in the beginning, to make a duo album. It just kind of happened,” said McVie, who will join Buckingham in concert Monday at Northrop auditorium in Minneapolis. “It didn’t take us that long.”

They worked on a few of her ideas, then went on tour with Fleetwood Mac in 2014 and later revisited the songs. Buckingham brought in five songs of his own, and before you know it they had an album.

“He and I always had a good chemistry musically,” McVie pointed out. “It seemed very natural to me. Easy, actually, to work with him in that way. We’re not the best of friends. We don’t hang out together. But when we get to the studio, we have a good connection.”

No Stevie, no tension

It could be because Stevie Nicks wasn’t involved. When Buckingham and his ex, Nicks, try to work together, there’s always, um, creative tension.

Nicks was busy doing a solo tour to promote her 2014 album “24 Karat Gold,” so Buckingham busied himself with the McVie collaboration.

The rest of Fleetwood Mac — founding drummer Mick Fleetwood and bassist John McVie — also participated in the recording. Not that this was ever going to be a Fleetwood Mac project.

The resulting album “Lindsey Buckingham Christine McVie” features five tunes by each, with Buckingham cowriting three of McVie’s numbers

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Book review: Rock biographer Stephen Davis chronicles Stevie Nicks in new book

The Hutchinson News
Posted Oct 25, 2017 at 10:38 AM

“Gold Dust Woman: The Biography of Stevie Nicks” by Stephen Davis. St. Martin’s Press, 2017. 352 pages. $18.29 / £20.61

Stephen Davis has an unusual wish for a man prior to the release of his 18th rock book — a biography of Fleetwood Mac singer and solo artist and songwriter Stevie Nicks.

“The main thing is I want to be in the next issue of AARP,” said Davis, who wrote “Gold Dust Woman” out of his Milton, Massachusetts, home. “She’s almost 70 and I’m 70, and they send out something like 25 million copies (actually the magazine claims more than 47 million readers).”

Davis said he is fascinated by Nicks, who found stardom relatively late (for a rock star) in her 20′s and still fills an arena both solo and with Fleetwood Mac. She recently announced an 18-month tour starting in mid-2018 with Fleetwood Mac. Her 40 top-50 hits include “Don’t Stop,” the signature song of former President Bill Clinton’s campaign.

“The arc of the story is that initially she wasn’t really wanted in Fleetwood Mac and eventually she went out on her own and became a bigger star than Fleetwood Mac,” said Davis, who began researching “Gold Dust Woman” in 2012 and finished it in 2016. “When I started writing, I thought the book would be a valedictory thing about someone whose career is winding now. Now, I’m just trying to keep up with her and will need to update the book when the paperback comes out in a year.”

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Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham on his collaboration with Christine McVie | The Independent

Rudi Greenberg
Tuesday 27 June 2017 15:13 BST
The Independent

The duo who have released a self-titled LP are currently touring the US before the Fleetwood Mac global tour next year

Before Christine McVie rejoined Fleetwood Mac in 2014 after a 16-year hiatus, she reconvened with guitarist Lindsey Buckingham, bassist and ex-husband John McVie and drummer Mick Fleetwood in the studio. Buckingham was working on a solo album and, before rehearsals began for Fleetwood Mac’s upcoming tour, the four – sans Stevie Nicks – played around with some songs.

“We didn’t have an idea what it was going to be, we just wanted to welcome her back,” Buckingham says. “Less than a week in we were like, ‘Oh, my God, this is better than it’s ever been.’

They recorded for a few weeks and then put things on hold until the tour wrapped. The resulting album, Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie, released this month, sounds like it could be a long-lost Fleetwood Mac album. It’s all there (except for Nicks): Buckingham’s jangly guitar and pop sensibility, Christine’s breathy vocals and melodic piano playing, the classic rhythm section.

We spoke with Buckingham ahead of the duo’s first tour.

Q: Correct me if I’m wrong, but this album is the first time that you, Christine, Mick and John worked together in the studio since 1987’s Tango in the Night.
A: That is true. We did do a Fleetwood Mac album, (2003’s) Say You Will, without Christine. I’d never really thought of it that way. Continue reading

Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie on Their New Fleetwood Mac Spinoff | Rolling Stone

The pair didn’t want to stop after the Mac’s last tour. So they hit the studio for the first time in decades

Back in 2014, something wonderful happened to Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie. They tried writing songs together for the first time in ages – taking a tentative, low-stakes approach – and were overjoyed to discover that “within the first hour,” as Buckingham puts it, “it was like, ‘Holy shit, whatever we used to have—'” “—is still there,” says McVie, sitting a few feet away. It’s mid-May, and the Fleetwood Mac icons are on a soundstage in L.A., about to rehearse. Those new songs grew into an album, Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie, which will imminently give way to a new tour, so they’ve booked this space for five weeks of practice.

The pair’s success was in no way guaranteed. Sure, back in the late Seventies, while working on Rumours and Tusk, McVie wrote epochal smashes like “Don’t Stop” and “Think About Me,” which Buckingham helped shape in the studio. (He also wrote plenty of hits, like “Go Your Own Way.”) But the making of those LPs had been famously turbulent – drugs, fights, love triangles – and the ensuing years hadn’t exactly been idyllic. “The Sixties-into-the-Seventies lifestyle ramped up, and by 1987? I don’t know how we ever got Tango in the Nightdone,” says Buckingham, 67. “We saw Stevie for a couple of weeks out of an entire year. Everyone was at their worst. Hard living.”

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Who are Fleetwood Mac, when is their tour and what is the Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie album? | The Sun

Fans have gone wild with the news that Fleetwood Mac are reuniting for a world tour next year

THE legendary Fleetwood Mac have announced they are coming together for a global 2018 tour. But what do we know about the tour, when will it take place, and which members will be involved?

Fleetwood Mac is made up of members Mick Fleetwood, John McVie, Christine McVie on the keyboard, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks

Who are Fleetwood Mac?

Fleetwood Mac are a British-American rock band who have sold over 100 million records worldwide – making them one of the most successful bands of all time. They formed back in 1967 and revealed their first album, Peter Greens Fleetwood Mac, in 1968.

The successful band has seen a number of changes to the line-up over the years, with the only original member still remaining being drummer Mick Fleetwood.

The band, pictured in 1973, has seen a change to the line-up over the years, with Bob Weston (far left) being a previous member

The band is now made up of members Mick Fleetwood, John McVie, Christine McVie on the keyboard, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks.

Their last tour was in 2014-2015 for their On With The Show world tour, which included two nights at London’s O2 Arena.

When is the Fleetwood Mac tour?

Christine McVie confirmed on The One Show that Fleetwood Mac will be going on tour next year.

She said: “We’re going to start rehearsing in March, next year. The tour is around June. It will be global.”

The 2018 tour is currently set to feature the full mid ’70s Fleetwood Mac line-up.

The band is due to perform at festivals in New York and Los Angeles this summer, but have no other live shows scheduled.

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Will Fleetwood Mac Tour Again? Christine McVie on Her New Album With Lindsey Buckingham and What’s Next for the Mac | Parade

By Alison Abbey
16th June 2017
Parade

The storied history of Fleetwood Mac has been well documented, from breakups and makeups, with a few band member shufflings along the way. But through all the ups and downs, The Mac has always come back together in one form or another. Now, members Christine McVie and Lindsey Buckingham have partnered up for their own project, the new album Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie, a collection of 10 original songs. The duo will hit the road this summer, starting June 21 in Atlanta, ahead of two Fleetwood Mac festival shows in July.

McVie chatted with Parade about working with her old friend, that well-publicized break she took from The Mac and what’s next for the band.

How did this project with Lindsey come about?
I had sent Lindsey a couple of demos of songs that I’d written and he did his Lindsey thing in his studio, made sense of them, and played them to me. I loved them. He said, “Why don’t we go into a proper studio and cut them?” That was the chrysalis of – the birth of – this album. Little did I think I’d end up doing a Lindsey/Chris album, but here we are.

Why did you retire from Fleetwood Mac in the ’90s?
I just couldn’t tour anymore. I didn’t want to live out of suitcases, and I was terrified of flying at that point. I was a nervous wreck by the end. It was nothing to do with the band members, at all. It was just that I’d had it. So I left, and I moved back to England. I bought myself a couple of dogs, and they became my life, but I tripped over one of them coming down the stairs one night and hurt my back. Fortunately there was nothing broken, but I got into painkillers, blah, blah, blah, the same old story, and I was going nowhere fast.

What brought you out of that darkness?
I decided to seek help and go to a psychologist. I talked about my flying problem, because I couldn’t travel. I spoke to him about all my other problems, and slowly I started to come out of this situation I’d found myself in. He said, “If you were to fly, where would you want to go to?” I said, “Well, I’d like to go to Maui and visit Mick [Fleetwood].” He said, “Well, why don’t you buy yourself a ticket?” This is how the whole thing with the Mac started. So I bought a first-class ticket to Maui, and about a week later Mick called me and said, “Hey Chris, I’m coming over to London to do some press for the four-piece Fleetwood Mac. Are you around?” I said, “Yes, and bizarrely enough I’d bought a ticket to come over and see you.” He was shocked because he knew I was terrified of flying. He said, “Cancel that ticket and we’ll fly back together.” That’s exactly what we did, and I didn’t even notice the wheels leaving the ground. Since then, I’ve loved flying.

And how did that parlay into a return to Fleetwood Mac?
When we went back to Maui, Mick was doing some gigs with his little blues band that he’s got on the island, so I just did a few gigs with them and thought to myself, “What have I started here?” It wasn’t that long before I had words with Mick about maybe coming back to the band. So we had a conference call, and everybody loved the idea. It was Lindsey who called me once and said, “Now, if you’re serious about this you’ve got to commit. You can’t be leaving again.” I said, “No, I commit, I commit! I’m serious.”

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Review: Buckingham-McVie album is nearly all Fleetwood Mac | Daily Mail (UK)

Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie, “Lindsay Buckingham Christine McVie” (Atlantic)

The first duet album from Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie is nearly Fleetwood Mac, with only Stevie Nicks missing from the band’s classic lineup.

Its development began even before McVie rejoined the band after 16 years for the 2014-2015 “On With the Show” tour, when Buckingham recorded several songs with the Mac rhythm section of Mick Fleetwood and John McVie, who also contribute to the finished album.

More layers were added when Buckingham worked on snippets of chords, lyrics and melodies he was sent by McVie and a couple of their writing collaborations – the vocals-soaked pop of “Red Sun” and “Too Far Gone,” with a Knopfler-esque, bluesy guitar riff and pounding drums – are among the highlights of the self-titled album.

“Game of Pretend” is a trademark McVie piano-led ballad which starts with great promise but turns to mush on the refrain. The other track she penned alone on the 10-song album is the excellent closer “Carnival Begin,” her best vocal wonderfully framed by Buckingham’s production touches and his typically yearning guitar solo that fades away too soon.

If the album was meant to be part of a full Fleetwood Mac comeback at some point, the Buckingham tunes have more of a solo album feel.

Still, the track sharing a name with the last Mac tour reveals both the beauty and apparent inescapability in the life of a musician like Buckingham – “As long as I stand, I will take your hand, I will stand with my band/There’s nowhere to go, but on down the road, let’s get on with the show.”

 

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