Fleetwood Mac Caps Classic West With Poignant Closing Set | Billboard

Billboard Online
7/17/2017
by

Fleetwood Mac operates on one’s imagination in a way few other bands can — whether within your musical memory, or onstage at Dodger Stadium as they were Sunday night (July 16), for the second evening of Classic West.

Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Scoop Marketing
Stevie Nicks of Fleetwood Mac performs during The Classic West at Dodger Stadium on July 16, 2017 in Los Angeles.

The sweetly intoned, plaintive melodies of Christine McVie, the now-gentle, now-angry mini-operas of Stevie Nicks, and what might be called the ecstatic agonies (“Bleed To Love Her,” anyone?) of Lindsey Buckingham, all swirl into an understanding that emotion will come to the fore. The shorthand for their genre is “hits,” and they delivered plenty to a crowd that roared appreciatively from the time the lights went down to usher in “The Chain” to the last notes of “Don’t Stop,” 20 songs later.

The inherent drama that suffuses any Fleetwood Mac performance might be baldly stated as “Who’s still in love with whom?” and the band not only lives with that as a sometimes-aggravating hangover — reliving your late twenties onstage as a member of a band whose average age hovers near 70 can’t always be easy — but as an evergreen dramatic conceit.

Opening with “The Chain” definitely fed the beast of tortured past relationships as a topic: “And if you don’t love me now/ You will never love me again” reverberated with feeling even as it showcased the group’s durable trademark sound — Fleetwood’s funereal drumbeats, John McVie’s underrated mutterings on bass, the ladies’ baleful harmonies, and Buckingham’s venomous leads. Buckingham’s clearly incapable of pretending it’s an evening’s casual entertainment and would come on at the end — spotlight chasing him as he gyrated somewhere near the park’s bullpen — to reinforce that he’s one of the great closers in the trade. Continue reading

Fans delirious as Stevie Nicks joins Tom Petty on stage | BBC News

The musicians collaborated on several songs in the 1980s / LILY GRAE (TWITTER)

It was Side A all the way when Tom Petty played the BST festival in Hyde Park on Sunday.

“We’re going to look at the show like it’s a giant one-sided vinyl,” said the star, “and we’re going to drop the needle all up and down the record.”

The set included nearly two dozen classics, such as Free Fallin’, I Won’t Back Down and Learning To Fly.

Stevie Nicks joined him halfway through the set for a special version of their 1981 hit Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around.

“You know that Tom Petty is my favourite rock star!” said the singer.

Nicks had earlier played a support slot, running through her Fleetwood Mac songbook with renditions of Dreams and Gold Dust Woman, alongside solo hits Edge of Seventeen and Landslide.

After playing Rhiannon, the 69-year-old noted she’d played the song at every concert since it was released in 1975.

“It’s never not been done,” she deadpanned. “Rhiannon: You just can’t get rid of her.”

Nicks also delved into her pre-fame catalogue with the Buckingham-Nicks song Crying In The Night which, she noted, was written in 1970, when she was a struggling musician working as a waitress in LA.

“Dreams do come true,” she told the audience. “Because 44 years later you can sing a song you thought nobody would ever hear in Hyde Park in London, England.” Continue reading

Review: Buckingham-McVie album is nearly all Fleetwood Mac | Daily Mail (UK)

Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie, “Lindsay Buckingham Christine McVie” (Atlantic)

The first duet album from Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie is nearly Fleetwood Mac, with only Stevie Nicks missing from the band’s classic lineup.

Its development began even before McVie rejoined the band after 16 years for the 2014-2015 “On With the Show” tour, when Buckingham recorded several songs with the Mac rhythm section of Mick Fleetwood and John McVie, who also contribute to the finished album.

More layers were added when Buckingham worked on snippets of chords, lyrics and melodies he was sent by McVie and a couple of their writing collaborations – the vocals-soaked pop of “Red Sun” and “Too Far Gone,” with a Knopfler-esque, bluesy guitar riff and pounding drums – are among the highlights of the self-titled album.

“Game of Pretend” is a trademark McVie piano-led ballad which starts with great promise but turns to mush on the refrain. The other track she penned alone on the 10-song album is the excellent closer “Carnival Begin,” her best vocal wonderfully framed by Buckingham’s production touches and his typically yearning guitar solo that fades away too soon.

If the album was meant to be part of a full Fleetwood Mac comeback at some point, the Buckingham tunes have more of a solo album feel.

Still, the track sharing a name with the last Mac tour reveals both the beauty and apparent inescapability in the life of a musician like Buckingham – “As long as I stand, I will take your hand, I will stand with my band/There’s nowhere to go, but on down the road, let’s get on with the show.”

 

Album Review – Lindsey Buckingham, Christine McVie | Irish Examiner

Ed Power
Sat 10th June, 2017

Buckingham McVie started life as a new Fleetwood Mac album, following the iconic soft-rockers’ sell-out 2014-2015 world tour.

Alas, best laid plans were undone when singer Stevie Nicks declined to be involved — a wispy absence that removed from the equation a vital component of the band’s chemistry.

There are many circumstances in which Fleetwood Mac could soldier on — however, a Nicks-free incarnation is unthinkable.

Instead, die-hards must make do with a first-ever stand-alone collaboration between the group’s twin creative lynchpins.

On classic LPs such as Rumours and Tango in the Night, much of the dynamism sprang from the tension between Lindsey Buckingham’s growling West Coast rock and Christine McVie’s tart confessionals. Musically, they are a text-book case of opposites attracting.

Here, Buckingham is the senior partner. His husky croon is to the fore on ‘Sleeping Around The Corner’ and ‘Feel About You’ — retro-pop nuggets that, in the best sense, feel like superior Mac pastiche.

Somewhat of a grumpy old man even in his youth, in his late sixties Buckingham’s singing remains impressively anguished, with lyrics rich in autumnal ennui.

Stylistically, the album is an unashamed grab-bag. ‘Red Sun’ and ‘Love Is Here To Stay’ are free-floating power-pop, the principals’s voices interweaving swooningly; ‘Too Far Gone’ and ‘All For Free’, meanwhile, evoke the dusky splendours of McVie staples ‘Everywhere’ and ‘Little Lies’. Nobody does bittersweet better, or glossier, and the project confirms her gifts have not deserted her.

With Fleetwood Mac rhythm section Mick Fleetwood and John McVie pitching in, the record brims with Mac touchstones: the gauzy melodies, rush of blood choruses, sing-along fade-outs.

Conversely, without the band label affixed, the record is at liberty to establish its own identity and it revels in that freedom. This is a slight return in which fans of 1970s rock will want to lose themselves over and over.

Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie: Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie Review | Paste Magazine

By Mark Lore  |  June 9, 2017
Paste Magazine

While Fleetwood Mac has maintained its reputation over the years as a bona fide live legacy act, getting all five members into the studio has proven elusive. You’d have to go back three decades to 1987’s Tango In the Night to hear a recording that features Lindsey Buckingham, Stevie Nicks, Christine and John McVie and patriarchal drummer Mick Fleetwood all contributing as usual.

Nicks and Buckingham checked out during a couple of abysmal ’90s records, before the original members reunited for 1997’s live comeback The Dance. Christine McVie left the next year, contributing to only two tracks on 2003’s Say You Will, and settling down in the English countryside for the next decade. Her return in 2014 and, more importantly, her renewed love for the band she’d joined in 1970, brought on hopes of another studio comeback for the Mac. Instead, Nicks opted to release a solo record and tour without her bandmates. What fans didn’t know was that the seeds for what would become Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie had already been planted.

The new record is being touted as a duet between McVie and Buckingham, even though the rhythm section (or as Buckingham accurately states in the album’s accompanying 17-minute documentary, “the greatest rhythm section there is”) is made up of none other than John McVie and Mick Fleetwood. Their tightly wound rhythms are almost as recognizable as the record’s namesake harmonies, and the album is all the better for it.

This collection could easily be viewed as a proper Fleetwood Mac record (at least as Mac as anything they’ve done post-Tango), but it sounds like the two songwriters are liberated by not having the heavy baggage of that name around their necks. Sure, the light and hooky “Feel About You” and “Lay Down For Free” sound like they could have been yanked from Tango or Mirage(how could they not with all the Mac DNA floating around the room?), but songs like “In My World” and “Love Is Here To Stay” tap into Buckingham’s more brooding and introspective solo material.

And that’s where McVie’s contributions here—whether songwriting or vocal—really come into play. For one, no one sings like her—no one—and her lead vocals and harmonies bring a distinctive light to the album. McVie’s piano-driven “Game of Pretend” comes from the “Songbird” songbook, and her lead vocal on “Red Sun” is as soothing as a 70-degree afternoon. Her return to music is welcome; and for those who get swept up in the Buckingham-Nicks storyline, this record shines a light on the sometimes-unsung songwriter McVie.

In fact, this—what is essentially a Fleetwood Mac joint—probably won’t leave many listeners pining for Nicks’ contributions. That’s no slight on the witchy songstress, but a testament to how incredibly potent each of the three songwriters’ contributions has been over the past 42 years (1979’s Tusk was essentially three solo records trapped inside one coke-fueled double LP). Lyrically, Buckingham-McVie isn’t nearly as caustic or wistful as the band’s ’70s material, but the songcraft is still there all these years later. And this is one hell of a coming-out-of-retirement party for Christine McVie.

Review: Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie’s Strange, Surprising Collaboration | Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone Online
By
June 8th, 2017

Our take on the unexpected full-length team-up between the two Fleetwood Mac songwriters

Well, here’s an album nobody thought would happen – the first-ever collabo from Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie. It’s full of surprises, considering we’ve all spent years already listening in on both their private worlds. But these two Fleetwood Mac legends have their own kinky chemistry. When McVie jumped back in the game for the Mac’s last tour, the songbird regained her hunger to write. And Buckingham remains one of the all-time great rock & roll crackpots, from his obsessively precise guitar to his seething vocals. They bring out something impressively nasty in each other, trading off songs in the mode of 1982’s Mirage – California sunshine on the surface, but with a heart of darkness.
So we’ve made it to the second paragraph of this review without mentioning any other members of Fleetwood Mac. That’s an achievement, right? We should feel good about that. So now let’s discuss how weird it feels that a certain pair of platform boots was not twirling on the studio floor while this album was being made. Stevie Nicks is the unspoken presence on this album, the lightning you can hear not striking. There’s something strange about hearing Lindsey and Christine team up without her, but that just enhances the album’s strange impact. This would have been the next Mac album, except Stevie didn’t want in. It sounds like that might have fired up her Mac-mates’ competitive edge – but for whatever reason, these are the toughest songs Buckingham or McVie have sung in years.
“In My World” is the treasure here – Lindsey digs into his favorite topic, demented love, murmuring a thorny melody and reprising the male/female sex grunts from “Big Love.” In gems like “Sleeping Around the Corner” and the finger-picking “Love Is Here to Stay,” he’s on top of his game, with all the negative mojo he displayed in Tusk or his solo classic Go Insane. McVie is usually the optimistic one, but she seizes the opportunity to go dark in “Red Sun.” And what a rhythm section – Mick Fleetwood and John McVie, cooking up the instantly recognizable groove no other band has found a way to duplicate. Everything about this album is a little off-kilter, right down to the way the title echoes the pre-Mac Buckingham Nicks. But if this had turned out to be a proper Fleetwood Mac reunion album, that would’ve felt like a happy ending – and who wants happy endings from these guys? Instead, it’s another memorable chapter in rock’s longest-running soap opera, with both Lindsey and Christine thriving on the dysfunctional vibes.

Lindsey Buckingham & Christine McVie Review | MOJO Magazine

Lindsey Buckingham & Christine McVie ****
Lindsey Buckingham & Christine McVie
EAST WEST. CD/DL

Fleetwood Mac’s new not-quite Fleetwood Mac album

The party line is that Stevie Nicks’ solo commitments have forced Fleetwood Mac to put their next album on hold. But as the recent Tango In The Night reissue proved, Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie were often the band’s great unsung partnership.

Confusingly, this duets album also includes bass guitarist John McVie and drummer Mick Fleetwood, making it essentially Fleetwood Mac, minus Nicks.

McVie brings the sing-song pop (Feel About You, Red Sun) and the slightly cloying Game Of Pretend; Buckingham, the whispered vocals and fingernail-splitting guitar solos on Sleeping Around The Corner and Love Is Here To Stay, plus the album’s best song: the nagging and melancholy In My World.

Does it miss Stevie Nicks? Yes, just as the last Fleetwood Mac album, 2003’s Say You Will, missed Christine McVie. But until all parties can sync their calen-dars, this will do nicely.

Mark Blake

Fleetwood Mac: Tango In The Night Deluxe Edition Review | Classic Rock Magazine

The soundtrack to the Yuppie era in all its designer-suited finery.

There’s a reason that 1980s nostalgia has never really taken hold, and that’s because the 1980s generally sucked. Sure, interesting things were happening on the fringes, but mainstream culture was taking the express elevator all the way down to Yuppie Hell. And playing through the speakers in that elevator was Tango In The Night.

With 1977’s Rumours, Fleetwood Mac had accidentally invented the 80s in all its self-absorbed cocaine glory three years early. A decade on, the pharmaceutical vitality which gave that album its spirit had given way to the hollow-souled, million-dollar chintz of Tango In The Night. That it sold by the truckload tells you all you need to know about 1987.

This 30th-anniversary ‘deluxe’ edition is the musical equivalent of digging up a Blue Peter time capsule and finding the films of Sylvester Stallone on VHS. In both cases, you can’t help thinking: “Did people really like that shit?” As with Rocky IV and Rambo, Fleetwood Mac’s 14th album has not aged well. The twinkling keyboards and electronic drums that cling to Everywhere and Little Lies like an Exxon Valdez oil slick may have been state of the art in 1987, but then so was the Sinclair C5.

But the production isn’t the biggest problem here — the songs are. Whatever magic Mac once possessed had long since been dispelled by time and internal psychodramas. Lindsey Buckingham would once have dismissed Family Man and You And I, Part II for being too trite, Christine McVie’s Mystified is barely a breath away from lift music, while Stevie Nicks’ increasingly strangulated warbling has the emotional resonance of a goat being strangled by a goose.


Continue reading

Album Review: Fleetwood Mac: Tango In The Night Deluxe | The Times

Will Hodgkinson
March 31 2017, 12:01am,
The Times

★★★★☆

Fleetwood Mac’s 1977 masterpiece, Rumours, is remembered as the ultimate cocaine album, but the warring superstar rockers saved the real excesses for ten years later. Tango in the Night is the last word in sophisticated, expensively produced soft rock, with such FM radio classics as Christine McVie’s Everywhere and Lindsey Buckingham’s Big Love sounding as if they were made for driving your Ferrari down Sunset Strip to.

The songs were, however, born of total chaos. The bassist John McVie was drinking himself into a stupor; Stevie Nicks, busy swapping cocaine for the damaging tranquilliser Klonopin, while also building up her now successful solo career, rarely turned up at the studio. The whole thing came to an end when guitarist Buckingham announced he was leaving the band, reportedly leading to an ugly physical confrontation between him and his former girlfriend Nicks.

All these years later the album seems less like a soundtrack to a designer lifestyle and more a portrait of collapse. Nicks’s little-girl-gone-to-seed croak on the ballad When I See You Again is heartbreaking, and the evergreen synthesizer pop of McVie’s Little Lies smoothes over words about refusing to face up to reality, something the band members appear to have been quite good at.

On this three-disc set not all of the alternative versions are strictly necessary, and Buckingham’s comedy voices on Family Man are as dated as a piano necktie, but for the most part the quintessential Eighties album has ended up being far more profound and enduring than anyone could have predicted. (Warner Bros)

The stories behind the songs that Stevie Nicks is singing on her ’24 Karat Gold Tour’ | MLive

Nicks, who performed at Van Andel Arena on Wed., Nov. 23 and at The Palace on Sun., Nov. 27, 2016, admitted this is not her typical solo tour. She called it a little darker than usual. This slideshow tells the stories behind many of the songs she performed. “It’s something different for me after all these years. I didn’t want to come out here and do the same Stevie Nicks stuff that you’ve seen 5,000 times.”

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Chrissie Hynde and the Pretenders opened for Nicks, performing for one hour. They performed songs from their 10th studio album, “Alone,” and some classics including: I’ll Stand By You,” “Back On The Chain Gang”, “Don’t Get Me Wrong,” and “Brass in Pocket.” Hynde made sure to put a little more emphasis on the line “been driving Detroit leaning” from the song “Brass in Pocket.”

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Story behind “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around”
Nicks brought out Chrissie Hynde of the Pretenders for this duet, originally performed with Tom Petty. The song is from Nicks’ first album, “Bella Donna” from 1981. Nicks says it wasn’t on the album at first, but producer Jimmy Iovine said it needed a hit single.

“Do you want me to go home and write a single? No, I don’t because a friend of ours (Tom Petty) has offered to give you an amazing song. If you don’t take this song and get this single, your record may tank. We have to thank Tom, because without that single, I may not even be standing here tonight.” Continue reading