Fleetwood Mac: Tango in the Night review – timely reissue coasts from gloss to gloom | The Guardian

Alexis Petridis’s album of the week
The Guardian
March 23rd, 2017

This 1987 classic is a blend of solid-gold pop and super-slick production, interwoven with the sound of a band sliding into chaos

Fleetwood Mac … ‘No gloss can hide the turmoil’ Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo

The mid-80s were not the kindest time for 60s and 70s rock legends. For every gimlet-eyed operator who successfully navigated an alien and unforgiving landscape of power ballads, crashing snare drums, Fairlight synthesisers and MTV moonmen – the Eagles’ Don Henley and Glenn Frey; Tina Turner – there were scores who seemed utterly lost. It was a world in which the natural order of things had been turned on its head to such a degree that the drummer from Genesis was now one of the biggest stars on the planet. David Bowie, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Lou Reed … at best, they ended up making albums that diehard fans pick over for tiny morsels that suggest they’re not as bad as the reputations preceding them; at worst they made stuff they’d spend subsequent years loudly disowning, involving terrible clothes, inappropriate producers, awful cover versions and – in extreme cases – attempts to rap. Continue reading

Stevie Nicks: Recording ‘Tango’ in my ex-boyfriend’s bedroom was ‘extremely strange | Miami Herald

BY HOWARD COHEN
hcohen@miamiherald.com

On Friday, March 10 (re-scheduled till March 31), Fleetwood Mac releases a 30th anniversary expanded edition of one of its most popular and influential albums, “Tango in the Night.” The lavishly packaged reissue offers a remastered version of the original album, a disc of B-sides and outtakes, plus another disc of 12-inch dance mixes of its hit singles like “Big Love” and “Little Lies” and a vinyl LP.

The 30th anniversary edition of Fleetwood Mac’s 1987 album, “Tango in the Night,” hits retail on March 10. The album includes four Top 40 singles, “Big Love,” “Seven Wonders,” “Little Lies” and “Everywhere” and remains the last studio album to feature the original “Rumours” lineup. Warner Bros./Rhino

For Stevie Nicks, the group’s star attraction, recording her parts for the 1987 album proved difficult. After the completion of a ragged tour for her third solo album, 1985’s “Rock a Little,” she went into rehab at the Betty Ford Center for a cocaine addiction. After her release, she was misguidedly placed on a Klonopin regimen. Few in her inner circle thought rehab would stick unless she was dosed on anxiety medication. They were wrong.

Her first test: joining her Fleetwood Mac band mates for the 1986 tracking sessions for “Tango in the Night.” The band hadn’t recorded since the release of “Mirage” in 1982.

Nicks’ ex-boyfriend Lindsey Buckingham, the group’s guitarist, was co-producing the band’s efforts, again, but this time the tension was poisonous, even by Fleetwood Mac’s standards.

“When I started recording for ‘Tango,’ they were recording at Lindsey’s house up on Mulholland somewhere. He lived there with his girlfriend Cheri and this record was being recorded at his house and I didn’t find that to be a great situation for me. Especially coming out of rehab,” Nicks said in an interview last year. “And then I was on Klonopin and not quite understanding why I was feeling so weird and this doctor kept saying, ‘This is what you need.’ It’s the typical scenario of a groupie doctor. Discuss rock and roll with you, so in order to do that he would keep upping your dose so you’d come in once a week.”

John McVie (seated), Mick Fleetwood (standing), Christine McVie (on floor), Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks (on seat) in a photo shoot from the “Tango in the Night” sessions. The original album was released in April 1987 and was a worldwide hit, especially in England where it hit No. 1. In the United States the album spent 44 weeks in the Top 40. Warners Bros./Rhino

Nicks sets the scenario: “I can remember going up there and not being happy to even be there and we were doing vocals in their master bedroom and that was extremely strange. In all fairness, it was like the only empty room and they had a beautiful master bedroom all set up like a vocal booth but I found it very uncomfortable, personally. I guess I didn’t go very often and when I did go I would get like, ‘Give me a shot of brandy and let me sing on four or five songs off the top of my head.’” Continue reading

Fleetwood Mac hit big with ‘Tango in the Night,’ then imploded! | Somethingelse Reviews

APRIL 14, 2015
BY 

Like more than one Fleetwood Mac recording subsequent to Rumours, 1987’s Tango in the Night grew out of trampled solo project by Lindsey Buckingham — and the title track bears the most striking resemblance to his quirky individual efforts. They were always welcome asides, but perhaps no where more so than this project.

Tango In The Night

The title track scuffed up a session that might have collapsed under the high-gloss pop sheen of hit tunes like Stevie Nicks’ “Seven Wonders” and Christine McVie’s “Little Lies.” Those two smash tunes (along with Lindsey Buckingham’s “Big Love” and Christine McVie’s “Everywhere”) helped make Tango in the Night the band’s second-biggest selling studio project ever — after, of course, Rumours.

Nicks’ “When I See Again,” with a smart assist from Buckingham, plumbs the dark emotions of a broken relationship once more. Tango in the Night is also notable for the tight songwriting bond between Buckingham and McVie; they co-wrote a trio of songs, including “Mystified.”

But something more ominous was already looming, both personally and professionally, for the drugged-out, worn-out Fleetwood Mac. Lindsey Buckingham, perhaps determined to actually have a solo career this time, walked out shortly before the band’s scheduled tour in support of Tango in the Night. Rick Vito and Billy Burnette were drafted to replace him for the subsequent Tango Tour through 1988. Continue reading

Eye Of The Hurricane | Classic Rock Magazine, Oct 2013

Words: Paul Elliott
Portrait: Neal Preston

Heroic drug abuse, physical violence, epic strops… Forget Rumours, Fleetwood Mac’s craziest album was Tango In The Night.

Fleetwood Mac

In December 2012, three members of Fleetwood Mac cried together. in public, at the memory of something that had happened all of 25 years previously. Singer Stevie Nicks, guitarist Lindsey Buckingham and drummer Mick Fleetwood were doing a round of media interviews to announce the band’s 2013 tour when they were asked about the events of 1987, when Buckingham quit the band following the release of the album Tango In The Night. Buckingham did not respond directly to the interviewer. Instead he turned to Nicks and Fleetwood and reiterated his reasons for leaving the group at a critical stage of their career: foremost among them, his sense that Nicks and Fleetwood had lost their minds and souls to drugs.

“What Lindsey said in that interview was very moving, ” Fleetwood says. “He told us: ‘I just couldn’t stand to see you doing what you were doing to yourselves. Did you ever realise that? You were so out of control that it made me incredibly sad, and I couldn’t take it any more.’ It was really powerful stuff. This was someone saying: ‘I love you.’ It hit Stevie and me like a ton of bricks. And we all cried, right there in the interview.” Continue reading

Fleetwood Mac’s Top 10 most downloaded tracks in the UK

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By Dan Lane

Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours looks set to re-enter the Official Albums Chart Top 10 this Sunday, 35 years after if first reached Number 1 in the UK. To celebrate, OfficialCharts.com reveal the band’s Top 10 most downloaded tracks of all time – the Official Fleetwood Mac Digital Top 10.

As Fleetwood Mac gear up to celebrate the 35th anniversary of the seminal 1977 album Rumours going to Number 1 in the UK, a series of deluxe re-issues of the record look set to put it back in the Official Albums Chart Top 10 this Sunday.

Released in February 1977, Rumours debuted at Number 7 on the Official Albums Chart on February 27 of that year (week ending March 5) – but it wasn’t until nearly a year later, on January 22, 1978 (week ending January 28), that Rumours finally peaked at Number 1, giving the Anglo-American band their first UK chart topping album.

To date, Rumours has spent a staggering 493 weeks on the Official Albums Chart, making it the most charting album in British history (Queen’s Greatest Hits is in second place with 484 weeks, with Bat Out Of Hell by Meat Loaf in third place with 474 weeks). Rumours is also one of the Top 20 biggest selling albums of all time.

Some 36 years after it was first released, Rumours’ appeal seems unwavering, transcending multiple generations of music fans and indeed musical formats. Understandably, tracks from Rumours make up half of Fleetwood Mac’s Top 10 most downloaded tracks.

Go Your Own Way tops the Official Fleetwood Mac Digital Top 10, with The Chain (widely recognised by many as the theme of BBC TV’s motor racing coverage) a very close second. Dreams, which has been covered by everyone from The Corrs to the cast of Glee, is at Number 5, while Don’t Stop (Number 8) and Songbird (Number 10) also make the Top 10.

Official Charts Company managing director Martin Talbot says:

“As someone who grew up with Rumours on the family stereo, it is great to see it back in the Official Albums Chart again – and our Official Fleetwood Mac Digital Top 10 really highlights just how timeless this iconic British band’s music is.”

The Official Fleetwood Mac Digital Top 10

1 GO YOUR OWN WAY
2 THE CHAIN
3 EVERYWHERE
4 LITTLE LIES
5 DREAMS
6 ALBATROSS
7 LANDSLIDE
8 DON’T STOP
9 BIG LOVE
10 SONGBIRD

© 2013 The Official Charts Company. All rights reserved.

In related news, Fleetwood Mac (featuring Mick Fleetwood, John McVie, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks) are set to embark on a 34-date reunion tour of the US in April, with a series of as-yet-unannounced European and Australasian dates set to follow.

Big Mac – Fleetwood Mac talks to Record Mirror (Apr 1988)

BIG MAC

Well, you can’t get much bigger then Fleetwood Mac, can you?

In the wake of Lindsey Buckingham’s much-publicised departure and their combined chart success.

Dave Zimmer talks to the band that just refuses to lay down and die….

Record Mirror (UK)
April 1988

RecordMirror_Apr88_FrontCover_small

Somebody should write a soap opera based on Fleetwood Mac’s career. They’ve been plagued by jealousy, bankruptcy and alcoholism; and when guitarist Lindsey Buckingham left the band last year, it looked like the end of the road.

Buckingham had been with Fleet­wood Mac since 1975 when he and Stevie Nicks helped catapult the rather obscure ‘hippy’ band into the big time with the LP ‘Rumours’. To date, it’s sold over 30 million copies worldwide. But the relationship between Nicks and Buckingham soured, as Stevie explains.

“If Lindsey said the wall in the studio was grey, I’d be absolutely sure it was pink. In order to get one of my. songs on a record I’d have to say ‘Okay, the wall’s grey Lindsey’. Otherwise it was back on the bus.

Continue reading