Huge difference in Tusk reissue prices between the UK and USA

Anyone noticed the massive price differences that Amazon are listing the recent Tusk deluxe edition and the soon to be released Live In Concert vinyl set that is culled from the same deluxe release of Tusk.

Today according to the Amazon UK website, you can pick up the Tusk deluxe edition for £41.84 that translate to $52.26 (at today’s exchange rates), now checking the Amazon.com site, the exact same release is listed as $93.19 (£66.94)

And, when we repeat this process on the In Concert vinyl set that is set to be released on Mar 4th, the price on Amazon in the UK is £23.99 ($33.40) and on Amazon.com the price is $54.14 (£38.89)

What gives Amazon, why are the prices so different between regions for the same item?

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FM-InConcert

Fleetwood Mac Tusk (Deluxe Edition) review | Pop Matters

BY MATTHEW FIANDER
12 February 2016

Tusk, Fleetwood Mac’s 1979 double album, is full of backstory. If its mega-successful predecessor Rumours had the Behind the Music-made backstories of deceit and division, Tusk (like the album itself) had several conflicting and chaotic backstories. It was the first record to cost over a million dollars. The affairs and divides of Rumours had, by 1979, grown into wider fissures between band members and, in some ways, full-on breakdown. There’s also the notion that this is the cocaine record, a product of excess and disconnection from sense.fleetwood-mack-tusk-650

Perhaps connecting all these stories together—or fracturing them further—is the idea that Tusk was Lindsay Buckingham’s brainchild. In the liner notes to this new Deluxe Edition of the album, Jim Irvin lays out Buckingham’s mindset post-Rumours. He didn’t want to lean back on success and make the same record again. He was also, so the essay suggests, influenced by the growing punk movement. That Irvin himself seems disingenuous about punk, referring to the movement as a “grubby breeze” and to the moderate chart success of the Ramones or the Damned as “if they were mould spores ready to discolor the musical wallpaper.” And though he sees punk and new wave as music with a “youthfully abrupt” attitude to the past, he does concede that Elvis Costello and the Clash, among others were “speedily evolving.” His attitude, colored by a clear love of the “plush delights” of Rumours, seems to echo Buckingham’s. He borrows the ethos of punk in claiming that Tusk was a “fuck you” to the business of music.

Digging into this new 5CD/DVD/2LP version of Tusk, with all its bonus tracks and liner notes and photos, suggests that Buckingham’s view of the record and its making veers us away from the notion of coke bloat. The album isn’t truly about unabashed excess. Instead, this new edition helps us to re-see the record as a deeply self-conscious document, wherein Buckingham’s turn to the Talking Heads and the Clash (influences largely absent on the actual music of Tusk) seem to suggest an any-port-in-the-storm approach to making new music. The truth, though, is that the success of Rumours was hardly a problem. Tusk suggests that Fleetwood Mac was for a moment—due to inexperience, drugs, personal rifts, whatever—unsure not of how to follow up Rumours, but of how to make any other record. The “idiocy of fame” Irvin suggests as a target for Fleetwood Mac rings as naïve even now. Buckingham’s genre-hopping was little more than diving into of-the-moment trends. Mick Fleetwood, according to liner notes, wanted to make an African record, calling it a “native record with chants and amazing percussion.” These starting points for Tusk suggest not a rejection of success, but rather a fundamental misunderstanding of the privilege it brings.tusk_deluxe-480x286

That misunderstanding bleeds into the confused album itself. But this misunderstanding, and all the other confusions that went into the record, is what makes it so fascinating to listen to. For one, Buckingham’s conceits of ambition distract from some of the album’s purest pop moments. “Sara” shimmers” on clean, crisp pianos and beautiful vocals (Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie are actually the voices that keep this record together, though their influence is undersold in the liner notes in favor of the Buckingham defiant-burdened-male-genius narrative). “Over & Over” is bittersweet, dusty country-rock. “Storms” feels both spare and dreamy, leaning on vocal harmonies and tumbling guitar phrasings. “Angel” is stripped down and lean, letting the rhythm section take over rather than Buckingham’s layering. “What Makes You Think You’re the One” is catchy, straight-on power-pop, even with the high-in-the-mix snares and Buckingham’s unruly, edged vocals (which appear plenty on the record). Continue reading

Lindsey Buckingham on Fleetwood Mac’s Risk-Taking Classic Album ‘Tusk’ | Billboard

Billboard Online
Nov 19, 2015
by Gary Graff

Lindsey Buckingham has long told the story of reaction inside and around Fleetwood Mac when 1979’s Tusk fell far short of sales for its predecessor, Rumours. “The conventional wisdom was, ‘You blew it,'” Buckingham recalls with a laugh. “A lot of people were pissed off at me for that.”

Fleetwood Mac Norman Seeff

Fleetwood Mac
Norman Seeff

Not so now.

The often experimental Tusk — which will be celebrated with a deluxe edition box set on Dec. 4 — may not have lived up to Rumours​’ diamond-certified status, but it was still a double-platinum release that hit No. 1 in the U.K. and No. 4 on the Billboard 200 and spawned a pair of top 10 hits in “Tusk” and “Sara.” More importantly it became a sonic inspiration (and has been cited as such) for many that followed and, in Buckingham’s mind, gave Fleetwood Mac a broader artistic license that his bandmates would later appreciate.

“For me, being sort of the culprit behind that particular album, it was done in a way to undermine just sort of following the formula of doing Rumours 2 and Rumours 3, which is kind of the business model Warner Bros. would have liked us to follow,” Buckingham tells Billboard. “We really were poised to make Rumours 2, and that could’ve been the beginning of kind of painting yourself into a corner in terms of living up to the labels that were being placed on you as a band. You know, there have been several occasions during the course of Fleetwood Mac over the years where we’ve had to undermine whatever the business axioms might be to sort of keep aspiring as an artist in the long term, and the Tusk album was one of those times.”  Continue reading

Fleetwood Mac’s TUSK is getting a new remaster with the deluxe, expanded treatment

Release information has just appeared on Spin CDs in the UK, where they list three new versions of the Fleetwood Mac’s multi-platinum Tusk album remastered by Lindsey Buckingham ** (needs to be verified). The album is listed as being available on Dec 4th, 2015 and the set is listed to be released in three editions:

  • Tusk (Deluxe Edition 5CD/1DVD-A/2 Vinyl
  • Tusk (Expanded 3CD Digi-pack)
  • Tusk (1CD Jewel Case – 2015 Remaster)

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The information listed on the website is as follows…

Posted on October 23, 2015

TUSK will be available on December 4.

  • Fleetwood Mac Tusk (Deluxe Edition 5CD/1DVD-A/2 Vinyl) £54.99,
  • Fleetwood Mac Tusk (Expanded 3CD Digi-pack) £12.99,
  • Fleetwood Mac Tusk (1CD Jewel Case – 2015 Remaster) £9.99

Fleetwood Mac builds on its formidable legacy as one of rock’s most legendary acts as they re-visit their most ambitious album with deluxe and expanded editions of TUSK. Originally released in 1979, the GrammyAward-nominated, double-album sold more than four million copies worldwide, and reached number 1 in the UK album charts, and included hits like “Sara,” “Think About Me,” and the title track. Continue reading