Indulgent Showdown: Fleetwood Mac’s ‘Tusk’ vs. The Clash’s ‘Sandinista!’ | The Observer

Observer Music
By Tim Sommer
13th Oct, 2016

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Deep in the heart of every rock musician, from the most credible to the most commercial, there lies someone whining, “Je suis un artiste! If only the world knew what a deep, tortured soul I am, and how complicated my record collection is!”

The more practical of these musicians merely peppers their catalog with maudlin and heartfelt ballads. Let’s call this the Bon Jovi method: “Perhaps you will forgive that Slippery When Wet stuff if I sing another song that is the musical equivalent of the page in the yearbook dedicated to that 11th grader who died.” Other artists make severe left or right turns, and produce albums dripping with uncharacteristic drama and musical complication; here I direct you to Music From ‘The Elder’ by Kiss, a histrionic, incomprehensible, and orchestra-laden concept album from 1981 that very nearly ended Kiss’ career (it’s actually a pretty good record, by the way, and features two songs co-written by Gene Simmons and Lou Reed).

Pop/rock history is absolutely strewn with such artifacts, from Pet Sounds to Bad Religion’s Into the Unknown (a fascinating pop/prog exercise from 1983 that was so offensive to the group’s fans that the band excised it from their catalog). In between these extremes, there’s Springsteen’s bold and courageous Nebraska, McCartney’s remarkable Firemen albums, Neil Young’s fascinating genre exercises (like Trans, Everybody’s Rockin’ and Arc), the Beastie Boys’ game changing Paul’s Boutique, and, of course, the great daddy of all of these sorts of records, Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music. There are also entire careers that are built on thwarting expectations, e.g. Scott Walker, Beck, Bowie and Prince.[i]

In the autumn of 1979 Fleetwood Mac, a wildly popular and influential band at the peak of their visibility and commercial prowess, released a much-anticipated double album that was interpreted by fans and media as radical, even experimental. Almost exactly a year later the Clash, a wildly popular and influential band at the peak of their visibility and credibility, released a much-anticipated triple album that was interpreted by fans and media as radical, even experimental.

Fleetwood Mac’s Tusk is lean, effective and almost completely without waste or filler. It showcases a great band at their prime. Alternately precise and luxurious, Tusk is one of the most underrated albums of the era. Continue reading

Fleetwood Mac – The Alternate Tusk to be released on Vinyl on Record Store Day 2016

Fleetwood Mac – Alternate Tusk
Event: RECORD STORE DAY 2016
Release Date: 4/16/2016
Format: 2 x LP
Label: Rhino
Release type: RSD Exclusive Release

Record Store Day offers the alternative version of Tusk from Fleetwood Mac’s deluxe box set as two LP set on 180 gram black vinyl. Limited to 5,000.

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Side 1
1. Over and Over
2. The Ledge
3. Think About Me
4. Save Me a Place
5. Sara

Side 2
1. What Makes You Think You’re the One
2. Storms
3. That’s All for Everyone
4. Not That Funny
5. Sisters of the Moon

Side 3
1. Angel
2. That’s Enough For Me
3. Brown Eyes
4. Never Make Me Cry
5. I Know I’m Not Wrong

Side 4
1. Honey Hi
2. Beautiful Child
3. Walk a Thin Line
4. Tusk
5. Never Forget

The album will also be available in the UK, Belgium, the Netherlands and likely more countries.

Click this link for UK release info

Now available: Fleetwood Mac, In Concert

From Rhino.com

Fleetwood Mac fans had their minds blown in late 2015 – or at least that’s the reaction we were going for, anyway – when Rhino reissued Tusk in a deluxe edition digitally and on CD that included 22 previously-unreleased live tracks from the band’s 1979-80 tour. For those who didn’t want to buy their umpteenth copy of Tusk, not even for nearly two dozen heretofore-unavailable concert performances, it was also a very frustrating release, especially when those folks were additionally annoyed by the fact that the material wasn’t available on vinyl.

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To those individuals, this piece may serve as the equivalent of an emotional massage, to release the tension you’ve been holding in your wallet since then: we’ve just issued Fleetwood Mac: In Concert, which features all of those live tracks on a 3-LP set pressed on180-gram vinyl.

The material on In Concert was recorded at four stops on the band’s tour: Wembley, Tucson, St. Louis, and Omaha. Some of the songs were recorded a few dates into the tour, others were recorded several months into the tour, but they’re all classic tracks, and the sound quality is outstanding.

ORDER THIS SET NOW HERE

Here’s the full track listing, to whet your appetite ‘til you can track down a copy for yourself: Continue reading

Huge difference in Tusk reissue prices between the UK and USA

Anyone noticed the massive price differences that Amazon are listing the recent Tusk deluxe edition and the soon to be released Live In Concert vinyl set that is culled from the same deluxe release of Tusk.

Today according to the Amazon UK website, you can pick up the Tusk deluxe edition for £41.84 that translate to $52.26 (at today’s exchange rates), now checking the Amazon.com site, the exact same release is listed as $93.19 (£66.94)

And, when we repeat this process on the In Concert vinyl set that is set to be released on Mar 4th, the price on Amazon in the UK is £23.99 ($33.40) and on Amazon.com the price is $54.14 (£38.89)

What gives Amazon, why are the prices so different between regions for the same item?

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FM-InConcert

Fleetwood Mac “In Concert” to be released on Vinyl | Press Release

Fleetwood Mac: in Concert Set for Vinyl Debut

Friday, 12 February 2016, 4:05 pm
Press Release: Warner Music

Fleetwood Mac: In Concert Set for Vinyl Debut
Triple-LP Collection Features 22 Live Recordings From The Band’s 1979-80 Tour
That Were Previously Available Only As Part Of The Tusk: Deluxe Edition

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Available On March 4 From Warner Bros. Records

Fleetwood Mac unveiled a massive Deluxe Edition of its revered double album TUSK late last year that featured 22 previously unreleased live performances selected from the band’s 1979-80 tour. Until now, those concert recordings have only been available as part of the set and only on CD and digitally. That will change soon with the release of FLEETWOOD MAC: IN CONCERT.

All of the live music from the 2015 reissue of TUSK will be available on March 4 from Warner Bros. Records as a three-LP set. Pressed on 180-gram vinyl, the albums will be presented in a tri-fold jacket.

Mick Fleetwood, John McVie, Christine McVie, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks originally released TUSK in October of 1979. The Grammy Award-nominated, double-album went onto sell more than four million copies worldwide and introduced fans to hits like ‘Sara,’ ‘Think About Me,’ and the title track.

The music heard on IN CONCERT was recorded at four stops during the band’s 111-show world tour promoting TUSK. This new collection serves as a worthy companion to the classic 1980 album LIVE. Although a few songs are duplicated from that album, including ‘Say You Love Me,’ ‘Landslide’ and ‘Go Your Own Way,’ each performance on IN CONCERT is unique and taken from a different show.

IN CONCERT boasts 10 songs not heard on LIVE, including ‘World Turning’ from the Fleetwood Mac’s 1975 self-titled release, and ‘The Chain’ from the band’s best-selling album RUMOURS (1977), a Grammy-award winning juggernaut that has sold more than 40 million copies.

Several songs from IN CONCERT were recorded at the Checkerdome in St. Louis just a month after the release of TUSK, and only seven shows into the tour. Those performances capture the band already in top form on songs like ‘Angel,’ ‘Save Me A Place’and ‘What Makes You Think You’re The One.’

The rest of the performances were recorded several months later, including 11 songs from the band’s six-night stand at Wembley Arena in London in June 1980. Among the highlights are ‘That’s Enough For Me,’ ‘Sisters Of The Moon,’ and the Top 10 smash from RUMOURS, ‘You Making Loving Fun.’

Continue reading

Fleetwood Mac Tusk (Deluxe Edition) review | Pop Matters

BY MATTHEW FIANDER
12 February 2016

Tusk, Fleetwood Mac’s 1979 double album, is full of backstory. If its mega-successful predecessor Rumours had the Behind the Music-made backstories of deceit and division, Tusk (like the album itself) had several conflicting and chaotic backstories. It was the first record to cost over a million dollars. The affairs and divides of Rumours had, by 1979, grown into wider fissures between band members and, in some ways, full-on breakdown. There’s also the notion that this is the cocaine record, a product of excess and disconnection from sense.fleetwood-mack-tusk-650

Perhaps connecting all these stories together—or fracturing them further—is the idea that Tusk was Lindsay Buckingham’s brainchild. In the liner notes to this new Deluxe Edition of the album, Jim Irvin lays out Buckingham’s mindset post-Rumours. He didn’t want to lean back on success and make the same record again. He was also, so the essay suggests, influenced by the growing punk movement. That Irvin himself seems disingenuous about punk, referring to the movement as a “grubby breeze” and to the moderate chart success of the Ramones or the Damned as “if they were mould spores ready to discolor the musical wallpaper.” And though he sees punk and new wave as music with a “youthfully abrupt” attitude to the past, he does concede that Elvis Costello and the Clash, among others were “speedily evolving.” His attitude, colored by a clear love of the “plush delights” of Rumours, seems to echo Buckingham’s. He borrows the ethos of punk in claiming that Tusk was a “fuck you” to the business of music.

Digging into this new 5CD/DVD/2LP version of Tusk, with all its bonus tracks and liner notes and photos, suggests that Buckingham’s view of the record and its making veers us away from the notion of coke bloat. The album isn’t truly about unabashed excess. Instead, this new edition helps us to re-see the record as a deeply self-conscious document, wherein Buckingham’s turn to the Talking Heads and the Clash (influences largely absent on the actual music of Tusk) seem to suggest an any-port-in-the-storm approach to making new music. The truth, though, is that the success of Rumours was hardly a problem. Tusk suggests that Fleetwood Mac was for a moment—due to inexperience, drugs, personal rifts, whatever—unsure not of how to follow up Rumours, but of how to make any other record. The “idiocy of fame” Irvin suggests as a target for Fleetwood Mac rings as naïve even now. Buckingham’s genre-hopping was little more than diving into of-the-moment trends. Mick Fleetwood, according to liner notes, wanted to make an African record, calling it a “native record with chants and amazing percussion.” These starting points for Tusk suggest not a rejection of success, but rather a fundamental misunderstanding of the privilege it brings.tusk_deluxe-480x286

That misunderstanding bleeds into the confused album itself. But this misunderstanding, and all the other confusions that went into the record, is what makes it so fascinating to listen to. For one, Buckingham’s conceits of ambition distract from some of the album’s purest pop moments. “Sara” shimmers” on clean, crisp pianos and beautiful vocals (Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie are actually the voices that keep this record together, though their influence is undersold in the liner notes in favor of the Buckingham defiant-burdened-male-genius narrative). “Over & Over” is bittersweet, dusty country-rock. “Storms” feels both spare and dreamy, leaning on vocal harmonies and tumbling guitar phrasings. “Angel” is stripped down and lean, letting the rhythm section take over rather than Buckingham’s layering. “What Makes You Think You’re the One” is catchy, straight-on power-pop, even with the high-in-the-mix snares and Buckingham’s unruly, edged vocals (which appear plenty on the record). Continue reading

Fleetwood Mac’s TUSK is getting a new remaster with the deluxe, expanded treatment

Release information has just appeared on Spin CDs in the UK, where they list three new versions of the Fleetwood Mac’s multi-platinum Tusk album remastered by Lindsey Buckingham ** (needs to be verified). The album is listed as being available on Dec 4th, 2015 and the set is listed to be released in three editions:

  • Tusk (Deluxe Edition 5CD/1DVD-A/2 Vinyl
  • Tusk (Expanded 3CD Digi-pack)
  • Tusk (1CD Jewel Case – 2015 Remaster)

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The information listed on the website is as follows…

Posted on October 23, 2015

TUSK will be available on December 4.

  • Fleetwood Mac Tusk (Deluxe Edition 5CD/1DVD-A/2 Vinyl) £54.99,
  • Fleetwood Mac Tusk (Expanded 3CD Digi-pack) £12.99,
  • Fleetwood Mac Tusk (1CD Jewel Case – 2015 Remaster) £9.99

Fleetwood Mac builds on its formidable legacy as one of rock’s most legendary acts as they re-visit their most ambitious album with deluxe and expanded editions of TUSK. Originally released in 1979, the GrammyAward-nominated, double-album sold more than four million copies worldwide, and reached number 1 in the UK album charts, and included hits like “Sara,” “Think About Me,” and the title track. Continue reading

Mick Fleetwood Goes His Own Way: Quotes from Thoreau | Sunday Express

Sunday Express (UK)
By: Mick Fleetwood
Sun, March 30, 2014

“If a man loses pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured, or far away.” – Henry David Thoreau

The production for Tusk was Fleetwood Mac's chance to divert from the expected[GETTY]

The production for Tusk was Fleetwood Mac’s chance to divert from the expected[GETTY]

Thoreau’s quote so brings to mind the experience of making the album Tusk. Much like when the Beatles made their White Album, Tusk, for us, was our walking away from predictability.

Kudos to Lindsey Buckingham, who was determined to break the mould of what we had done with Rumours and get away from the possibility of what can so often happen when success impedes artistic expression.I think Tusk was the most important album we ever made. It’s also my personal favourite and now I can appreciate how it was a crucial platform for us all, especially Lindsey. It satiated his drive to try new things.

It was also a time when we each learned to find our own voice. Coming out of the emotional rollercoaster of Rumours, the drama remained. A real shift had occurred, resulting in each of us pinpointing our singular creative method of survival. Continue reading