See Lindsey Buckingham, Christine McVie Play Haunting ‘In My World’ on ‘Fallon’ | Rolling Stone

Seductive track highlights new duets album from Fleetwood Mac duo

 

Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie performed their haunting new single “In My World” on Thursday’s Tonight Show.

Over a minimalist, fingerpicked guitar, Buckingham creates a spooky angst with his lead vocal, evolving from a hushed croon to an untamed wail. McVie sang in harmony throughout, and their four-piece backing band added to the choral-like swell of harmonies on the choruses.

The track concluded with an adorable display of camaraderie, as McVie offered Buckingham an encouraging hand on the shoulder during his visceral guitar solo.

“In My World” appears on the duo’s newly issued duets album, which also includes contributions from Fleetwood Mac members Mick Fleetwood and John McVie (but, notably, not Stevie Nicks).

Buckingham and Christine McVie will kick off a summer tour behind the LP June 21st in Atlanta. After their trek concludes in July, the duo will reconvene with Fleetwood Mac that month to co-headline the bi-coastal Classic East and Classic West festival.

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Album Review – Lindsey Buckingham, Christine McVie | Irish Examiner

Ed Power
Sat 10th June, 2017

Buckingham McVie started life as a new Fleetwood Mac album, following the iconic soft-rockers’ sell-out 2014-2015 world tour.

Alas, best laid plans were undone when singer Stevie Nicks declined to be involved — a wispy absence that removed from the equation a vital component of the band’s chemistry.

There are many circumstances in which Fleetwood Mac could soldier on — however, a Nicks-free incarnation is unthinkable.

Instead, die-hards must make do with a first-ever stand-alone collaboration between the group’s twin creative lynchpins.

On classic LPs such as Rumours and Tango in the Night, much of the dynamism sprang from the tension between Lindsey Buckingham’s growling West Coast rock and Christine McVie’s tart confessionals. Musically, they are a text-book case of opposites attracting.

Here, Buckingham is the senior partner. His husky croon is to the fore on ‘Sleeping Around The Corner’ and ‘Feel About You’ — retro-pop nuggets that, in the best sense, feel like superior Mac pastiche.

Somewhat of a grumpy old man even in his youth, in his late sixties Buckingham’s singing remains impressively anguished, with lyrics rich in autumnal ennui.

Stylistically, the album is an unashamed grab-bag. ‘Red Sun’ and ‘Love Is Here To Stay’ are free-floating power-pop, the principals’s voices interweaving swooningly; ‘Too Far Gone’ and ‘All For Free’, meanwhile, evoke the dusky splendours of McVie staples ‘Everywhere’ and ‘Little Lies’. Nobody does bittersweet better, or glossier, and the project confirms her gifts have not deserted her.

With Fleetwood Mac rhythm section Mick Fleetwood and John McVie pitching in, the record brims with Mac touchstones: the gauzy melodies, rush of blood choruses, sing-along fade-outs.

Conversely, without the band label affixed, the record is at liberty to establish its own identity and it revels in that freedom. This is a slight return in which fans of 1970s rock will want to lose themselves over and over.

Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie: Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie Review | Paste Magazine

By Mark Lore  |  June 9, 2017
Paste Magazine

While Fleetwood Mac has maintained its reputation over the years as a bona fide live legacy act, getting all five members into the studio has proven elusive. You’d have to go back three decades to 1987’s Tango In the Night to hear a recording that features Lindsey Buckingham, Stevie Nicks, Christine and John McVie and patriarchal drummer Mick Fleetwood all contributing as usual.

Nicks and Buckingham checked out during a couple of abysmal ’90s records, before the original members reunited for 1997’s live comeback The Dance. Christine McVie left the next year, contributing to only two tracks on 2003’s Say You Will, and settling down in the English countryside for the next decade. Her return in 2014 and, more importantly, her renewed love for the band she’d joined in 1970, brought on hopes of another studio comeback for the Mac. Instead, Nicks opted to release a solo record and tour without her bandmates. What fans didn’t know was that the seeds for what would become Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie had already been planted.

The new record is being touted as a duet between McVie and Buckingham, even though the rhythm section (or as Buckingham accurately states in the album’s accompanying 17-minute documentary, “the greatest rhythm section there is”) is made up of none other than John McVie and Mick Fleetwood. Their tightly wound rhythms are almost as recognizable as the record’s namesake harmonies, and the album is all the better for it.

This collection could easily be viewed as a proper Fleetwood Mac record (at least as Mac as anything they’ve done post-Tango), but it sounds like the two songwriters are liberated by not having the heavy baggage of that name around their necks. Sure, the light and hooky “Feel About You” and “Lay Down For Free” sound like they could have been yanked from Tango or Mirage(how could they not with all the Mac DNA floating around the room?), but songs like “In My World” and “Love Is Here To Stay” tap into Buckingham’s more brooding and introspective solo material.

And that’s where McVie’s contributions here—whether songwriting or vocal—really come into play. For one, no one sings like her—no one—and her lead vocals and harmonies bring a distinctive light to the album. McVie’s piano-driven “Game of Pretend” comes from the “Songbird” songbook, and her lead vocal on “Red Sun” is as soothing as a 70-degree afternoon. Her return to music is welcome; and for those who get swept up in the Buckingham-Nicks storyline, this record shines a light on the sometimes-unsung songwriter McVie.

In fact, this—what is essentially a Fleetwood Mac joint—probably won’t leave many listeners pining for Nicks’ contributions. That’s no slight on the witchy songstress, but a testament to how incredibly potent each of the three songwriters’ contributions has been over the past 42 years (1979’s Tusk was essentially three solo records trapped inside one coke-fueled double LP). Lyrically, Buckingham-McVie isn’t nearly as caustic or wistful as the band’s ’70s material, but the songcraft is still there all these years later. And this is one hell of a coming-out-of-retirement party for Christine McVie.

Review: Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie’s Strange, Surprising Collaboration | Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone Online
By
June 8th, 2017

Our take on the unexpected full-length team-up between the two Fleetwood Mac songwriters

Well, here’s an album nobody thought would happen – the first-ever collabo from Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie. It’s full of surprises, considering we’ve all spent years already listening in on both their private worlds. But these two Fleetwood Mac legends have their own kinky chemistry. When McVie jumped back in the game for the Mac’s last tour, the songbird regained her hunger to write. And Buckingham remains one of the all-time great rock & roll crackpots, from his obsessively precise guitar to his seething vocals. They bring out something impressively nasty in each other, trading off songs in the mode of 1982’s Mirage – California sunshine on the surface, but with a heart of darkness.
So we’ve made it to the second paragraph of this review without mentioning any other members of Fleetwood Mac. That’s an achievement, right? We should feel good about that. So now let’s discuss how weird it feels that a certain pair of platform boots was not twirling on the studio floor while this album was being made. Stevie Nicks is the unspoken presence on this album, the lightning you can hear not striking. There’s something strange about hearing Lindsey and Christine team up without her, but that just enhances the album’s strange impact. This would have been the next Mac album, except Stevie didn’t want in. It sounds like that might have fired up her Mac-mates’ competitive edge – but for whatever reason, these are the toughest songs Buckingham or McVie have sung in years.
“In My World” is the treasure here – Lindsey digs into his favorite topic, demented love, murmuring a thorny melody and reprising the male/female sex grunts from “Big Love.” In gems like “Sleeping Around the Corner” and the finger-picking “Love Is Here to Stay,” he’s on top of his game, with all the negative mojo he displayed in Tusk or his solo classic Go Insane. McVie is usually the optimistic one, but she seizes the opportunity to go dark in “Red Sun.” And what a rhythm section – Mick Fleetwood and John McVie, cooking up the instantly recognizable groove no other band has found a way to duplicate. Everything about this album is a little off-kilter, right down to the way the title echoes the pre-Mac Buckingham Nicks. But if this had turned out to be a proper Fleetwood Mac reunion album, that would’ve felt like a happy ending – and who wants happy endings from these guys? Instead, it’s another memorable chapter in rock’s longest-running soap opera, with both Lindsey and Christine thriving on the dysfunctional vibes.

Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie make an almost Fleetwood Mac record | Daily Telegraph (AUS)

It really should be a Fleetwood Mac album. The debut duo album from Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie sounds like a Fleetwood Mac album but is missing one essential voice: Stevie Nicks.

Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham: ‘I said to Christine, ‘You can’t leave again’ | The Guardian (UK)

30 minutes with…
Peter Robinson
Thurs 1st June 2017
The Guardian

The guitarist talks about how Christine McVie – with whom he has recorded a duet album – rejoined the band

Lindsey Buckingham: ‘Christine told me she had some rough ideas … I, of course, took great liberties with them in my studio.’ Photograph: ACE/Rex/Shutterstock

Hello Lindsey. Where are you? I’m in London and it’s quite hot.
I’m in Los Angeles and you’d think it would be hotter, but it’s actually quite cool.

What have you done so far today?
I’ve got three kids who are all in the last couple of weeks of school so my wife and I got up, had coffee and breakfast, and got the kids off to school. I went out and took my morning walk up a hill and down to get the blood going, then had a shower, and immediately got on the phone to do interviews.

Now here we are.
Here we are. A little bit later, I’m off to rehearsals. We’ve got a couple of Fleetwood Mac festival shows, but they’re interspersed with Christine and I doing a few dates – we’re starting off by doing 20 or so shows.

Let’s talk a bit about your new album with Christine [1] before I subtly manoeuvre the conversation on to demanding information about the new Fleetwood Mac album. A lot of it was done remotely, is that right?
Well, only initially. It was done in stages – before Christine decided to rejoin Fleetwood Mac, Mick Fleetwood, John McVie and I had gone into the studio, just the three of us, to cut some of my songs. We put that material on the shelf. A year after that, Christine phoned up Mick and was nosing around about wanting to rejoin the band.

“Nosing around”?
Yes! I don’t think she assumed we’d necessarily be OK with it — we had been doing quite well as a four-piece. I think she was trying to nose around to see if there was any openness to it before she got too assertive or specific about it. [2] I had to have a conversation with Christine and say: “Well, we’d love you to come back, but you can’t leave again.” She told me she’d been reconnecting with her creative muse and had some rough ideas she sent to me – I, of course, took great liberties with them in my studio. And she was interested in these songs I’d been working on, and Mick and John thought it would be good to bring her over early and cut tracks on some of these things. It was unbelievable. We only expected to do it for a couple of weeks but we stayed for a month. Nobody was saying it was a duet album – we didn’t care what it was!

So riddle-me-ree: given that this album has involvement from so many members of the band, how many songs could have been Fleetwood Mac songs?
That’s sort of a question you can’t answer …

Have a go.
Well, defining something being a Fleetwood Mac song is calling it a Fleetwood Mac song, you know? Nothing becomes Fleetwood Mac until that’s what you call it. The thing that defines this duet album as being a duet album is that it has elements of what I’ve learned over the last 15 years and brought to my own work, which is away from the palette of Fleetwood Mac. But there’s also a heart that exists by the symmetry of being only the two of us.

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Lindsey Buckingham And Christine McVie Rediscover Their Magical Musical Connection | Forbes

Steve Baltin
June 2nd, 2017
Forbes.com

It’s a Monday after noon on the Sony Pictures Lot when I drive on to meet Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie as the two iconic singer/songwriters rehearse for their upcoming tour in celebration of Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie, their first album as the duo of Buckingham and McVie.

When I tell the guard who I am there to see, he replies, “Really? I love them both.” In hindsight, it is no surprise. Maybe more than any other band, Fleetwood Mac defined the marriage of pop and rock, crafting some of the most beloved and iconic songs of the rock era. Between the two of them, Buckingham and McVie wrote or played a part in “Go Your Own Way,” “Never Going Back Again,” “Over My Head” and the sublime “Songbird,” among countless more rock era standards.

Given the beauty, majesty and universality they have conveyed so many times before it’s not surprising that in rediscovering their musical connection after almost two decades apart the pair of Buckingham and McVie have crafted arguably the perfect album for 2017. While most of music understandably tries to make sense of and protest the current administration and the continued global atrocities happening on a daily basis, Buckingham and McVie have delivered an album of hope and optimism, one that brings a much-needed sweetness back to the world of music for a sublime 45 minutes of near perfect pop.

I was fortunate to speak with the two greats about the superb new album.

Steve Baltin: This is day six of rehearsals?

Lindsey Buckingham: Yes, we came in and basically did a lot of prep, which we thought was only gonna take a couple of days and someone had given us a lot of stuff that was not usable and we had to start over. Took most of the first week, so there wasn’t a lot of getting up and playing the first week.

 Christine McVie: Once we did start playing, it happened quite quickly. These guys are good.

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First Listen: Lindsey Buckingham & Christine McVie | NPR

Fleetwood Mac’s guitarist and keyboardist team up for a new album

Link to new album stream (only available in North America)

Pre-Order the CD and Vinyl below

People often think of Fleetwood Mac as a band propelled to artistic eminence by interpersonal turmoil. Who could forget that Rumours, the band’s defining album, was the product of a period of libertine excess and relational meltdowns? Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks were on the rocks, Christine McVie and John McVie were divorcing and Mick Fleetwood’s civilian marriage was disintegrating, too. Long before bloggers began parsing insinuating lyrics from Taylor Swift and others who’ve passed through her orbit, there was perverse sport in scrutinizing the wistful, wounded or prickly lines in Fleetwood Mac songs, not to mention group members’ on-the-record comments and on-stage interactions, for evidence of unresolved conflict.

No such history hangs over the pairing of Buckingham and Christine McVie, he a famously exacting guitarist and producer, she a blues-schooled keyboardist, and each of them singers and songwriters responsible for significant chunks of their band’s discography. Over the decades they’ve ventured into a handful of direct collaborations, but they haven’t truly explored the potential of their partnership until now. Their album features most of the band’s classic lineup (notably, minus Nicks), but gets its identity from ideas generated within the closed circuit of the duo; all of the songs are credited to Buckingham, McVie or both. Continue reading

Christine McVie reveals why she returned to the spotlight with new duet album | Daily Express

By CLAIR WOODWARD
PUBLISHED: 00:01, Sun, May 28, 2017
DAILY EXPRESS

FLEETWOOD Mac star Christine McVie reveals why she returned to the spotlight with her band… and a new duet album.

Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie return with a new duet album

The new album from Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie feels like a big, warm hug.

The great melodies, intimate harmonies and terrific arrangements are instantly recognisable as coming from two of the band’s songwriters yet they’re new and intriguing enough to make it more than just another side project from an iconic group.

And for Christine, 73 – the understated genius behind the keyboards in Fleetwood Mac and writer of some of their most recognisable songs (Don’t Stop, Little Lies, Say You Love Me, Hold Me and Everywhere) – the sensation of reconnecting with old friends was the inspiration behind the new collaboration.

She officially retired from the band in 1998, after stepping away from touring a few years earlier, and it was her return to it for the 2015 reunion tour that sparked the collaboration with Lindsey.

“We’ve always had a particular musical relationship since he first joined the band – it was immediate,” Christine explains in her warm, honeyed tone.

“The whole band was just chemistry abounding but Lindsey and I, me being the piano player and him the guitar player, understand each other musically without saying anything.

“We’ve always worked well together over the years but never thought about doing an album together until recently and now we wonder why we didn’t think about doing it before.

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Why I’ve gone my own way: On the edge of 70, Stevie Nicks addresses a few rumours… head on! | Daily Mail

By Craig McLean
Daily Mail
May 27th, 2017

Turning her back on Fleetwood Mac. Teaming up with Chrissie Hynde. And ditching drugs with a little help from Prince. The rock icon confronts all those rumours

Now this is a treat. It’s Saturday night in a cavernous rehearsal facility in the San Fernando Valley, over the hills from Hollywood, and I’m enjoying a private concert from rock ’n’ roll’s greatest woman – a living, breathing, dancing, sunglasses-indoors legend. Ahead of an American tour, Stevie Nicks is running through a selection of hits from her multi-million-selling career as a solo artist and as frontwoman with Fleetwood Mac.

Rhiannon, Gold Dust Woman, Stand Back, The Wild Heart, Edge Of Seventeen: these are some of the best-loved songs of the past 40 years. And the woman who wrote them – more used to wowing arenas – is standing a few feet away, singing them to me, bashing a tambourine as if her life depended on it, swirling in a vision of black scarves and drapes.

Stevie Nicks has had her own well-publicised battles with addiction in the Seventies and Eighties

During a break, I sit down with Nicks and, as she cradles her beloved terrier Lily, she talks. And talks. At the age of 69, this warm, witty woman remains as irrepressible as ever. As is usual in the world of Fleetwood Mac, there’s a lot to discuss. One topic is her upcoming US shows with fellow icon Chrissie Hynde, in support of Nicks’ 24 Karat Gold album. Another is rumours of a Fleetwood Mac tour – a tour that’s possibly a farewell one.

But more pressing is the imminent release of Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie. It’s ostensibly a duo album from Mac guitarist Buckingham and keyboard player/singer McVie. In the set-up and billing, it feels like a successor to Buckingham Nicks. This legendary ‘lost’ 1973 album was made by Stevie and Lindsey – then a couple – before the Californians joined a mouldering English blues band led by drummer Mick Fleetwood and assisted by bass player John McVie.

Their duo act didn’t last, and neither did their relationship. But Nicks’ and Buckingham’s songwriting contribution – not to mention their split, as famously documented in their songs on 1977’s 40-million-selling album Rumours – helped rocket-power Fleetwood Mac to Seventies rock’s mega-league.

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